Recently in Photography

  Page 187 of 302 in Photography  

The world looks much different when viewing it on the LCD of an Infrared-modified camera. The sky darkens, clouds glow with intensity, and trees look like they belong on another planet. There are many applications for an IR-modified camera, including for law enforcement, but fine art photography is one of the most enjoyable uses.

Exit, I-5 Rest Stop I5 Rest Stop Exit - Captured with an IR-modified Olympus E-P1. Photo by Derrick Story. Click on image for larger version.

I've been shooting with an Olympus E-P1 modified by W.B. Hunt Co. in Melrose, MA. You can see a gallery of images captured with this rig on the TDS Flickr page. If you're interested in an easy and enjoyable way to shoot IR, you might want to look in to these modified kits. Prices for conversions range between $149.95 and $399.95, depending on the camera to be converted. You can find out more by contacting Stan Goldberg at W. B. Hunt. The phone number is 781-462-2319, or contact him via email, sgoldberg[at]wbhunt[dotcom].


twitter.jpg Follow me on Twitter


While testing the Canon EOS 60D, I wanted to see if I could go from Raw capture to online publishing without using a computer. As it turns out, I could.

I inserted an Eye-Fi Pro X2 8 GB SDHC Wireless Flash Memory Card in to the 60D, then checked its status on the Eye-Fi menu built in to the camera. (Many new cameras are adding this feature. The menus will vary depending on the model.)

eye-fi-menu

The menu takes much of the guess work out of using the Eye-Fi card since you get information about access point, connection status, etc. Plus, you can enable or disable the card's ability to transmit -- a much appreciated feature in itself.

For my test, I took a picture of some Nasturtiums. I then processed the Raw file in-camera, followed by uploading the newly created Jpeg to Flickr. Here's what the image looks like right out of the camera without any further processing.

Nasturtiums

What a great team! In-camera Raw processing, built-in Eye-Fi menus, and the Eye-Fi card itself. No computers required.

If you want to know more about the Eye-Fi card, including how to set it up using Eye-Fi software, visit the Eye-Fi web site.


twitter.jpg Follow me on Twitter


Ken Latman Fall Photo Assignment

Here's a gallery of images that will dazzle and delight. The assignment for October 2010 was "Fall." Check out this great set of images from members of the TDS virtual camera club. And which one will be the SizzlPix Pick of the Month?

The December 2010 assignment is "Indoor Lighting." Start working on your contribution now. Details can be found on the Member Participation page. You can now submit photo assignment pictures up to 800 pixels in the widest direction.

Please follow the instructions carefully for labeling the subject line of the email for your submission. It's easy to lose these in the pile of mail if not labeled correctly. For example, the subject line for next month's assignment should be: "Photo Assignment: Dec. 2010." Also, if you can, please don't strip out the metadata. And feel free to add any IPTC data you wish (These fields in particular: Caption, Credit, Copyright, Byline), I use that for the caption info.


Photo by Ken Latman. (Click on it to see enlarged version.) You can read more about how Ken captured this shot, plus see all of the other great images on the October 2010 Gallery page.


Good luck with your December assignment, and congratulations to all of the fine contributors for October. I think everyone did a great job this month!


twitter.jpg Follow me on Twitter

-


Now Available! The Digital Photography Companion. The official guide for The Digital Story Virtual Camera Club.

  • 25 handy and informative tables for quick reference.
  • Metadata listings for every photo in the book
  • Dedicated chapter on making printing easy.
  • Photo management software guide.
  • Many, many inside tips gleaned from years of experience.
  • Comprehensive (214 pages), yet fits easily in camera bag.

Technorati Tags: , ,

The EOS 60Dis a creative departure from Canon's normally conservative upgrade philosophy. The magnesium construction that many loved with the 50D has been replaced by an aluminium and polycarbonate resin body. The LCD is now hinged, allowing it to swing and swivel. And in general, the 60D just looks different than its predecessors. It's really a whole new DSLR.

Canon 60D with Articulated Screen

And how does it perform? In this week's show, I walk you through some of its best features, and a few of its missteps. But the bottom line is, if you're looking to upgrade from a Rebel, like to shoot HD video, and want more control over your photography, the EOS 60D is a camera to seriously consider.

Listen to the Podcast

You can also download the podcast here (31 minutes). Or better yet, subscribe to the podcast in iTunes. You can support this podcast by purchasing the TDS iPhone App for only $2.99 from the Apple App Store.

Monthly Photo Assignment

High ISO is the November 2010 Photo Assignment. You can read more about how to submit on our Member Participation page. Deadline for entry is Nov. 30, 2010. Entries must be recorded at ISO 800 or above.

TDS Summer 2011 Photography Workshop

We're making plans now for the Summer 2011 TDS Photography Workshop. If you want your name on the reserve list, just drop me a line.

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. It's a blast!

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper -- Try the $7.99 Sample Kit.

Make Your Photos Sizzle with Color! -- SizzlPix is like High Definition TV for your photography.

Blurb believes passionately in the joy of books - reading them, making them, sharing them, and selling them. Learn more by visiting Blurb on The Digital Story.




Technorati Tags:
, , , , ,


My 5 Favorite Lowepro Bags of 2010

pro_runner_inside.jpg

As the Photography Evangelist for Lowepro, I get to test all the new gear they produce. And when I say test, I mean load it up and hit the road.


Inside a Lowepro Pro Runner 300 AW. My current favorite mid-sized backpack.


I've traveled to Washington DC with a Fastpack 250, Germany with a Pro Trekker 300 AW, Bermuda with a Pro Runner 300 AW, Kauai with a Exchange Messenger, and on and on.

Over the months, I've become very fond of some of these bags. I have many that I like, but there are 5 that I would not want to live without. I posted an article about them on the Lowepro blog. You might want to hop over there and read the post and check out the links. I'll also list them here for you:

As I said, there are others I use all the time and like, but these are my current favorites.


twitter.jpg Follow me on Twitter


"Wasp Meal" - Grab Shot 205

"As winter was getting nearer in Madrid, the last insects were running for their lives," writes Michel Bricteux. "So was this wasp, feeding on cured ham. Note the wasp's tongue between the two mandibules shaped to cut the food."

Michel Bricteux Grab Shot "Wasp Meal" by Michel Bricteux. Click on image for larger version (Do it! It's worth it.)

Michel captured this compelling image with a Nikon D3X with a Nikon 105mm f/2.8 lens. ISO was set to 320 with a shutter speed of 1/200th.

This is our 205th Grab Shot! Wow. If you want to review the collection that began back in 2006, go to our Grab Shots page.

If you have a candid you'd like to share, take a look at our Submissions page, then send us your Grab Shot. We'll try to get it published for you on The Digital Story.

And you can view more images from our virtual camera club in the Member Photo Gallery.


The Digital Story Podcast App is the best way to stream or download weekly TDS podcast episodes. No more syncing your iPhone or iPod Touch just to get a podcast. And there's more! Tap the Extras button for free passes and discounts and the current Grab Shot by our virtual camera club members. Each podcast episode has its own Extras button, too, that contains more goodies such as pro photo tips. And the best part is, The Digital Story Podcast App is your way to help support this show.Download it today!


twitter.jpg Follow me on Twitter


You're working in cold conditions and get a call on your iPhone. So you have to quickly yank off a glove to use the touchscreen before the ringing stops. Very stressful!

Well, it doesn't have to be that way thanks to the makers of FIVEPOINT Gloves. Their specially-designed conductive fingertips let you touch, tap, stroke, slide and pinch your touch-screen gadgets in any way you choose. This includes iPhones and iPads. Plus, they are nimble enough to use with your camera too.

FivePoint Gloves

You can order FIVEPOINT Gloves directly from the etre shop in either medium or large sizes for the following prices: £24.99 GBP (That's about $39.33 USD or €29.52 EUR.). They ship worldwide.


twitter.jpg Follow me on Twitter


On a crisp, autumn day in Sonoma County, I took the IR modified Olympus E-P1 on a walk. I used an Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 14-150mm F4.0-5.6 zoom lens for this shot. Settings were ISO 400, f/9 at 1/400th of a second.

Wisteria Lane, Santa Rosa "Wisteria Lane"- Infrared shot captured with a modified Olympus E-P1. Photo by Derrick Story. Click on image for larger version.

I'll have more information soon on these modifications.


twitter.jpg Follow me on Twitter


Photographers aren't the easiest people to buy gifts for. It's not that there isn't anything they want, but who can afford to get a loved one $1,400 DSLR body? I can help. Here are 10 great gifts for $50 or less that should thrill that favorite shooter in your life.

The Gift List

Listen to the Podcast

You can also download the podcast here (28 minutes). Or better yet, subscribe to the podcast in iTunes. You can support this podcast by purchasing the TDS iPhone App for only $2.99 from the Apple App Store.

Monthly Photo Assignment

High ISO is the November 2010 Photo Assignment. You can read more about how to submit on our Member Participation page. Deadline for entry is Nov. 30, 2010. Entries must be recorded at ISO 800 or above.

TDS Spring 2011 Photography Workshop

We're making plans now for the Spring 2011 TDS Photography Workshop. If you want your name on the reserve list, just drop me a line.

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. It's a blast!

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper -- Try the $7.99 Sample Kit.

Make Your Photos Sizzle with Color! -- SizzlPix is like High Definition TV for your photography.

Blurb believes passionately in the joy of books - reading them, making them, sharing them, and selling them. Learn more by visiting Blurb on The Digital Story.




Technorati Tags:
, , , , ,


iPhoto '11 gets a lot of coverage for its online output services, but if you have an inkjet printer, you might be impressed with what it can do at home too. The trick is to first open the regular print dialog box (File > Print), then click on the "Customize" button. Go to Full Screen Mode, and you've got an entire print center at your fingertips.

iPhoto Custom Print Dialog Click the "Custom" button in the iPhoto '11 print dialog box to reveal a whole new world. Notice the Adjust panel controls just for that print job. Click on image for larger version.

You have a variety of themes, backgrounds, and borders to choose from. If you want to print multiple photos at one, you can also select from a handful of layouts. But my favorite feature is the Adjust panel of controls that only affect the print job, not the photo in your library.

To enable this, click on the photo itself (in the custom print work area), then click on the Adjust button. You have an entire set of image adjustment sliders, plus 3 presets. This allows you to fine tune the photo for the print job without worrying about changing the image that resides in the iPhoto library.

If you want to make a more permanent adjustment, double-click on the image, and you get iPhoto's 3-tabbed adjustment panel. Now the edits you make will affect the library version too.

One last tip while working in the custom print dialog box. Click on the photo and you'll see a zoom slider appear. You can zoom in on parts of the photo, then drag it to reposition it in the frame. Very handy for last minute composition adjustments.

If you want to save a digital version of the image you've customized, click Print, then click the PDF button and choose the option you want. Using that control, you can even return a Jpeg version of your creation to the iPhoto library. Nifty!


twitter.jpg Follow me on Twitter