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It's tempting, isn't it? The Canon Pro-100 13" photo printer released in 2012 for $499 is available now for just $119 after rebate. That's a pretty big savings for an output device with a 4.5 star user rating on B&H Photo's site.

canon-printer-1024.jpg

As you may recall, I took the Canon Rebate Challenge, and they did indeed deliver my $250 Mastercard gift card. So, that leaves us with the investment itself.

In terms of actual prints, I think the Canon Pro-100 printer is worth every penny. When I send a job its way, the Pro-100 gets right to work and produces beautiful output.

I can connect with it via USB cable, WiFi, and AirPrint. It doesn't seem to care which method I use to send data. It just works.

When Canon releases their new 13" photo printer, which they are sure to do soon, I would expect certain upgrades. For example, there will be a nice LCD screen on the device to assist in setup and use. With my older Pro-100, communication requires a computer and the proper Canon software. An LCD would be a highly welcome feature.

They may be improvements in the dye technology. New ink formulas are possible, for sure. How will they impact what emerges from the printer, who knows? Chances are reasonable that it would be hard to tell the difference between actual output without knowing.

The latest Canon multifunction printers include goodies like Alexa commands. That, I couldn't care less about. Although, I would like more printing options via the existing AirPrint technology.

As much as I would enjoy some of these improvements, especially the LCD screen, I'm not sure they are worth the extra $300-$400 that they would cost me. So as long as I can get ink for the Pro-100, it's a better choice for my budget at the moment. (I say this now without seeing what Canon will actually release in the future :-)

But there is one thing that I know for sure. Thanks to the great Pro-100 deal, I'm making prints right now. And that's definitely worth a lot to me.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #647, August 7, 2018. Today's theme is "Digitizing, Printing, and More!." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

I guess you could say that I'm a 2-way photographer. In one direction, I'm keenly interested in making prints from my digital images. Going the other way, I'm fascinated by methods for digitizing my analog shots. And in today's TDS podcast, I talk with Peter Krogh, author of "Digitizing Your Photos". Plus I share my first experiences with the Canon Pro-100 and Red River's Polar Luster Metallic paper. What a show!

Interview with Peter Krogh

Peter's book, Digitizing Your Photos with Your Camera and Lightroom is a cornucopia of helpful information for developing an efficient and high quality workflow for scanning analog content.

I sit down and talk with Peter during the first segment of today's show.

Use this link for a 10 percent discount. I also have a coupon code that you can use at checkout as well: AFFstory

Setting Up and Testing the Canon Pro-100 Printer

Now that I have my rebate, it's time to start printing with the Canon PIXMA PRO-100 Wireless Professional Inkjet Photo Printer . It's still on sale until the end of August with a $250 rebate, resulting in a final price of $119.99.

After my first day of printing with it, here are my pros and cons.

The Amazing Red River Polar Luster Metallic 255 Inkjet Printing Paper

Prints-1024.jpg

I've never used inkjet stock like the Red River Polar Luster Metallic 255. The luster surface with the metallic base create a compelling look that is magical under direct lighting.

In fact, I'm adding a new light set up to my studio just for these prints. More on this during this segment of the show.

Updates and Such

You can become a member of our Inner Circle by clicking on this link or by clicking on the Patreon tile that's on every page of The Digital Story.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Portfoliobox - Create the site that your best images deserve by visiting Portfoliobox. And get a 20 percent discount by using our landing page!

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Mirrorless cameras in general, and Olympus Micro Four Thirds bodies specifically, are excellent hosts to vintage SLR optics. But just like everything else in life, some matches are better than others.

Nikon Series E 50mm Olympus PEN-F with Nikon Series E 50mm f/1.8 "Pancake" lens. Photo by Derrick Story.

A particularly good combination are the Nikon Series E optics with, in my case, the Olympus PEN-F mirrorless camera. Not only does the styling of the PEN-F look good with these lenses, it also has specific settings to facilitate the use of these older optics.

Nikon Ahead of its Time with the Series E Optics

The Nikon Series E lens family has an interesting history. They were originally introduced the 1980s to accompany the new line of compact Nikon bodies, including my favorite, the Nikon FG. Both the Series E lens family, and the FG were designed to be light and versatile. But traditional Nikon shooters generally criticized the tandem as too lightweight and not deserving of the Nikon nameplate.

Turns out, at least in my opinion, Nikon was ahead of its time. The FG is intelligent, easy to use, and not much bigger than my MFT cameras. My favorite Series E optics include the 50mm f/1.8, 35mm f/2.5, and the 100mm f/2.8. They are sharp, light, and mount beautifully on mirrorless bodies.

Nikon Series E 100mm Olympus PEN-F with Nikon Series E 100mm f/2.8 portrait lens. Photo by Derrick Story.

The Olympus PEN-F Perfectly Designed for These Lenses

lens-settings.jpg

For my Olympus PEN-F, I'm using an affordable K&F Concept Lens Mount Adapter ($22) that's well-machined and provides a snug fit.

The PEN-F even allows me to write lens metadata to the file at time of capture using its unique Lens Info Settings menu (Gear K > Utility > Lens Info Settings). I can create a profile for each non-digital lens that I use, and the PEN-F will include its metadata with the rest of the file info. It's so cool. I've programed a function button on the PEN-F to bring up that menu so I can quickly change the profile when I switch out lenses.

Because of the cropped sensor, I use the Series E 50mm as a 100mm optic, and the Series E 100mm as a 200mm telephoto. Their compactness makes it easy to include them in my carry-around kit. Here's a comparison of the Nikon Series E and Canon FD 100mm optics.

P8046477-etsy-canon-nikon.jpg The Nikon Series E 100mm f/2.8 next to the Canon FD 100mm f/2.8.

And the weight difference is even more dramatic. The Canon tipped my scale at nearly 13 ounces, and the Nikon weighed in just over 7 ounces. When you're a Nimble Photographer, those differences really add up.

Images That Truly Look Different

At this point, it's time to talk about the images themselves. I really like the Series E 50mm for portraits. I shoot with it wide open at f/1.8. It provides a flattering sharpness at the point of focus, with softened tones in the foreground and background.

Here's a portrait of Theresa working on the back patio using this combination. I captured in RAW with the PEN-F and processed it in Capture One Pro 11. I didn't use any sharpening or softening adjustments - just let the image stand on its own so you could see the character of the lens/camera combination.

Theresa with Series E 50mm "Theresa Working in the Backyard" - Olympus PEN-F with Nikon Series E 50mm lens set to f/1.8. Photo by Derrick Story.

I focused on her glasses. Notice how the laptop and pants in the foreground have this delightful glow to them? Here hair, skin tones, and eyes are nicely in focus, but not edgy. And the background has a soft bokeh that looks far better than what my iPhone created for the reference shot in its computational photography Portrait mode ;-)

The Bottom Line

If I told you that this new portrait lens setup was available for less than $100, you probably would think that's a mistake. But it isn't. And that's the beauty of using vintage lenses with cameras that are truly designed to accommodate them. It's the creative gift that just keeps giving.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

For those times that you want 4K video, but don't want to part with your favorite camera that doesn't support it, Canon offers the PowerShot SX740 HS for $399.

canon-sx740.png

This pocketable zoom includes:

  • 20.3MP CMOS Sensor
  • DIGIC 8 Image Processor
  • 24-960mm (35mm Equivalent)
  • 40x Optical Zoom with OIS
  • 3" Tilting LCD Display
  • ISO 100-3200 (Extended)
  • 4K Video and 4K Time-Lapse Recording
  • Wi-Fi and Bluetooth Connectivity
  • 10-fps Continuous Shooting

The release of this camera is interesting to me. It seems designed to fill gaps in a traditional photographer's kit by offering 4K video and 4K time-lapse at a somewhat affordable price. And since it doesn't take up much room in the camera bag, the SX740 can quietly augment your existing toolset.

I have no idea if this strategy will be effective. But in the age of dying low-end consumer compacts, it seems worth a try.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #646, July 31, 2018. Today's theme is "Sony RX100 VI: You Can Have it All" I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

A subcompact camera with a 1" sensor is a luxury indeed. And for that reason alone, the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 VI Digital Camera is worth a look. But then add a relatively fast Zeiss Vario-Sonnar 24-200mm zoom, popup electronic viewfinder, and 4K video recording, and you have to ask yourself, "What the heck is going on here?" We're going to answer that question in today's TDS photography podcast.

Sony RX100 VI: You Can Have it All

There is a lot to like about this camera... so much so, that it would probably take me two more articles to cover all of the stuff that I didn't get to here. And if you're looking for an ultra-compact all-in-one capture device, it's going to be hard to find a more capable machine.

P7256358-gear-RX100.jpg

That being said, the one thing that was missing for me was the physical experience of holding a more substantial camera. In other words, I missed the feeling of taking pictures with a camera that feels great in the hands.

This is not a knock on the RX100 VI. It was designed to serve as a marvelous compact for those who need a small form factor. And as such, Sony knocked it out of the park. And if that's what you need for business travel or vacation, I can easily recommend this camera...

... except for the one thing that I haven't talked about yet: its cost is $1,200. On one hand, it's totally worth the steep price tag. Combine the features, image sensor, and exceptional zoom lens, and you have a deluxe package that should command a premium price. But the fact of the matter is, $1,200 is a lot of money for a compact camera. And if you invest that amount of money, you'd better get your shots out of it, and that means using it more often than just during travel.


Read the full review! "The Sony RX100 VI - A Compact Beast" - The RX100 VI is a pricy, no-holds-barred compact camera. Does its extensive feature set and fantastic image quality justify the price? Here's my take - http://thedigitalstory.com/2018/07/Sony-RX100VI-review.html.


So, then, what is the answer to the question: Is it worth it? I can say, "Yes it is." But, is the Sony RX100 VI for you? Well, that depends on your credit card balance, disposable income, and yes, the most important person in your life who might see you using it and ask: "Oh, that's a cute camera. How much did it cost?"

Nauticam Releases Underwater Housing for Sony RX100 VI

F-Stoppers reports: "While the pocket-sized camera is clearly ideal for travel, the NA-RX100 VI housing is just as practical. Weighing 2.3 pounds (1.05 kilograms), you'll be happy to hear the system will take up very little space and weight in your carry-on or checked baggage.

If you like deep dives, the underwater housing can be taken to a depth of 380 feet (100 meters). It's a nice selling point, but how many divers go to such depths? The housing ships with a standard interchangeable port, which was not found on earlier versions of the Sony RX100 underwater housing line. The standard port allows use of the full zoom range -- up to 200mm -- and can be equipped with the M67 Flip Diopter Holder, which allows photographers to add the SMC-1 Super Macro Converter for shooting the tiniest ocean critters.

The new NA-RX100 VI is priced at $1,100 and is available to order now through the Nauticam website.

No Longer Waiting for my Canon Rebate

On the June 11, 2018 TDS Podcast I mentioned that "I'm Taking the Canon PIXMA PRO-100 Rebate Challenge" and had mailed in all the required documents for my $250 rebate. And I'm happy to report that I now have my rebate. Here's the final chapter.

Nikon counts down to new mirrorless

DP Review reports: "Following an earlier leak, Nikon has officially started the clock on a countdown to its upcoming 'special event', widely assumed to be the launch of a new mirrorless system. The timer is counting down to 1pm, on the 23rd of August (Tokyo time). That's midnight in New York, 5am in London and 9pm on the previous day for the DPReview office here in Seattle."

Do You Have a Film Camera that Needs a Good Home?

Over the last year, I've received donations from TDS members who have film cameras that need a good home. What I do is inspect the items, repair and clean as I can, then list them in TheFilmCameraShop where I can find a good home for them. If you're interested in donating, please use the Contact Form on TheNimblePhotographer site. And thanks for you consideration!

Thanks to Bill Armon, and others who have previously contributed their gear to TheFilmCamerasShop.

Updates and Such

I've updated our Directory to Portfolios by TDS Photographers page. Stop by and see what your peers are publishing.

You can become a member of our Inner Circle by clicking on this link or by clicking on the Patreon tile that's on every page of The Digital Story.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Portfoliobox - Create the site that your best images deserve by visiting Portfoliobox. And get a 20 percent discount by using our landing page!

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 VI digital camera refuses to acknowledge the normal physical limitations of traditional compact photography. Measuring a mere 4.0" x 2.3" x 1.7", and weighing-in at just 10.6 ounces, most of us would be thrilled to get a 1" sensor with 20MPs resolution, which we do. But there's a whole lot more to this sophisticated device.

P7256362-gear-RX100.jpg

I've been shooting with the RX100 VI for a few weeks. And during that time, a number of its attributes have really impressed me. And those are what I'll cover in this article. Let's start with the body itself.

Physical Design

Aside from being wildly compact, I was surprised by many of its physical features. The 3" LCD back panel is gorgeous, rendering sharp, colorful images using its 921,600 pixels. Not only is it a touchscreen as well, but it tilts using a clever hinged design that allows for low and high angle shooting, and for selfies.

The only knock against it is that I couldn't view the screen horizontally while wearing polarized sunglasses. That seems like a small thing, but it was a real bummer when working outside. I could either remove my sunglasses, or turn the camera vertically. This seems opposite of what it should be - one of the very few missteps I encountered during testing.

P7256364-gear-RX100.jpg

The popup .39" XGA OLED electronic viewfinder (EVF) has an impressive resolution of 2.36m dots for easy composition. The EVF also uses a ZEISS T* coating, to ensure clarity, and has a one-push access design for convenient switching between the LCD and EVF.

For as tiny as the EVF is, it's easy to use. And when you enable it via the "finder" switch on the side of the camera, it also powers up the device. There's also a diopter adjustment to calibrate the view to your eyesight. And, incredibly, readouts as well. I was wildly impressed with its performance.

Right beside the EVF is the popup flash. That's right, you get both. I wouldn't recommend it as the sole light source for a scene. But as a fill light, it comes in very handy.

And finally, the control ring around the zoom lens is very useful for changing the aperture in aperture priority mode, or for enabling program shift in program mode.

P7256366-gear-RX100.jpg

The LCD can be configured to your tastes, depending on how much info you want displayed, by cycling through the views via the display button. If you press the separate function button (Fn), a very nice screen overlay appears with options for most of the basic settings that you'd want, such as ISO, metering mode, and flash compensation setting.

Performance

In short, this is a very responsive camera. It powers up quickly, swiftly focuses, and has virtually no shutter lag. You're not going to miss many shots with the RX100 VI.

Lens and Image Quality

The Carl Zeiss Vario-Sonnar zoom is a beauty. This lens is comprised of 15 elements in 12 groups, 8 of them aspherical. That's right, 8 aspherical elements. The f/2.8 maximum aperture is welcomed at the wide end (24mm). But even when you zoom all the way out to 200mm, the maximum aperture is still a respectable f/4.5.

P7256374-gear-RX100.jpg

There's really no practical subject that you can't cover with this lens. I used the 24mm wide more often than I anticipated. But also zoomed in to 200mm optically, and could go even beyond that with clear image zoom (16X) and digital zoom (32X). Going whale watching? Not a problem.

The Jpeg files were sharp, contrasty and colorful. The detail was excellent. Quite frankly, they looked as I expected them to. The following files are at full resolution and straight out of the camera with no editing or enhancement.

Audi Wheel

Audi Interior

Close Up of Tribute

Detail of Tribute

I wasn't able to test the RAWs, because none of my apps could decode the new RX100 VI files. I do have them in storage, however, so I will be able to peek at them up the road.

Overall, an excellent performance for image quality.

Bottom Line

There is a lot to like about this camera... so much so, that it would probably take me two more articles to cover all of the stuff that I didn't get to here. And if you're looking for an ultra-compact all-in-one capture device, it's going to be hard to find a more capable machine.

That being said, the one thing that was missing for me was the physical experience of holding a more substantial camera. In other words, I missed the feeling of taking pictures with a camera that feels great in the hands.


Listen to My Hands-On Review! "Sony RX100 VI: You Can Have it All - TDS Photo Podcast 645" - http://thedigitalstory.com/2018/07/Sony-RX100VI-review-podcast.html.


This is not a knock on the RX100 VI. It was designed to serve as a marvelous compact for those who need a small form factor. And as such, Sony knocked it out of the park. And if that's what you need for business travel or vacation, I can easily recommend this camera...

... except for the one thing that I haven't talked about yet: its cost is $1,200. On one hand, it's totally worth the steep price tag. Combine the features, image sensor, and exceptional zoom lens, and you have a deluxe package that should command a premium price. But the fact of the matter is, $1,200 is a lot of money for a compact camera. And if you invest that amount of money, you'd better get your shots out of it, and that means using it more often than just during travel.

P7256373-gear-RX100.jpg

So, then, what is the answer to the question: Is it worth it? I can say, "Yes it is." But, is the Sony RX100 VI for you? Well, that depends on your credit card balance, disposable income, and yes, the most important person in your life who might see you using it and ask: "Oh, that's a cute camera. How much did it cost?"

The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 VI digital camera is available now for $1,198.


Nimble Photographer Logo

The Sony RX100 VI digital camera has a high Nimbleosity Rating. What does that mean? You can learn about Nimbleosity and more by visiting TheNimblePhotographer.com.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Canon Rebates - Do They Deliver?

The short answer is: yes, but maybe not exactly the way you'd expect.

rebate-1024.jpg

When Canon offered a $250 "rebate" on its excellent PIXMA PRO-100 Wireless Professional Inkjet Photo Printer, I did not want to pass it up. My 13" Epson was DOA, and I needed a new output device. Problem was, I had experienced problems with Canon rebates in the past, and I was a little gun shy. I decided to give the program another chance.

I meticulously prepared my rebate package by cutting out the UPC code, filling out all the little boxes on the rebate form, and including my sales receipt. I checked the envelope address twice to make sure that everything was in order. Then I sent it off on June 11, 2018.

After a month, I hadn't heard anything and talked about the adventure on the TDS Photography Podcast. A few of my listeners suggested that I visit the Canon Rebate site and inquire about my submission.

I used the chat function on their site and was instructed to send an email to canonrebates@acbcoop.com. I did that, and a couple days later I received a response stating that my rebate had been approved and that I would receive a card in the mail. And sure enough, on July 24, 2018, I did. It took less than six weeks from start to finish.

What I received was a Canon Mastercard Prepaid Card for $250. I had to activate it at MyPrepaidCenter.com, which was easy. And I was given the option to set up an account to track my card's activity, which I did.

It's not really a rebate in terms of cash back. In fact, the two places you cannot use the card is at an ATM or gas station. But you can use it for a variety of purchases at most retailers. The expiration date is January, 2019.

So, yes, I have my rebate in the form of a prepaid card that has an expiration date. Not ideal, but not terrible either. Looks like I'll be doing my part to keep the economy healthy by going shopping with my new Canon Mastercard.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Aperture users who have aging libraries from the past don't need to keep nursing their geriatric host application to view, edit, and share those images. Photos for macOS can handle that job just fine.

When I bought a new iMac for my studio computer, I opted not to load Aperture on it. Instead, I have Photos for macOS, Lightroom, Capture One Pro, and Luminar. That computer is connected to two Drobos that house my images from the last 15 years. Many of those shots are inside Aperture "managed" libraries.

When I need to access content from one of those libraries, I simply double-click on the file container in the Finder. It will have the extension: aplibrary.

screenshot_17Aperture-Library-Original.jpg Original Aperture library.

The Mac launches Photos, and displays a Preparing Library... screen. The conversion goes at a good rate, ranging from just a few minutes to longer depending on the size of the library. Once Photos is ready with the content, it will display all of your previous Aperture images in its new interface.

iphoto-events.jpg Migrated Aperture library displayed in Photos for macOS. Notice how the original albums are displayed in the sidebar.

Your Aperture albums are retained and stored in a folder named: "iPhoto Events". From this point, you can use Photos editing tools, extensions, and all of the other goodies to manage your shots. Keep in mind that this converted library is not the System Library, rather a separate library. You can switch back and forth by quitting Photos, then holding down the Option key when relaunching the app.

Back at the Finder level, two things have happened. First, the file extension for the original Aperture library was changed to: migratedaplibrary. Then a second Photos library appears with the extension: photoslibrary. My recommendation is to archive the original library and use the new one for your current work.

migrated-library.jpg Back at the Finder level, you now have two versions of the original Aperture library.

This process is really easy, and you can move forward with your images using all of the Photos tools that I outline in my book, The Apple Photos Book for Photographers. Give it a try!

The Apple Photos Book for Photographers, 2nd Edition

Updated for macOS High Sierra, the The Apple Photos Book for Photographers, 2nd Ed. provides you with the latest tips, techniques, and workflows for Apple's photo management and editing application. Get your copy today!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #645, July 24, 2018. Today's theme is "FOPS and the New Mirrorless Revolution" I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

It makes total sense that the mirrorless revolution began without Canon and Nikon. On one level, that's what made it a revolution. FOPS - Fujifulm, Olympus, Panasonic, and later, Sony - previous underdogs, blazed the trail that many of us journey on today. But it was only a matter of time until the lords of the manor realized that they too must travel this road. And after a few notable detours, Canon and Nikon appear to be catching up. And when they do, the mirrorless revolution will enter phase two. But for reasons different than you might think. And that's our topic on today's TDS Photography Podcast.

FOPS and the New Mirrorless Revolution

2018 is a Photokina year, and the perfect stage for both Canon and Nikon to show off their full frame mirrorless cameras. Nikon has already begun to tease their release. And I'm sure that Canon isn't far behind.

So what does this mean for mirrorless photography? For enthusiasts, I don't think much. Many Canon and Nikon ex-patriots have already found new homes. And I doubt most of them would ever go back. Pros who had previously dismissed mirrorless bodies, however, should be keenly interested in these new offerings.

But don't expect Canon and Nikon to release anything truly innovative. That's not their gift to the community. Their machines will be powerful, robust, and feature excellent image quality. Something a pro can depend on.

mirrorless-v2.jpg

The real change will be led by FOPS (Fuji, Olympus, Panasonic, and Sony) and their response to the increased competition introduced by Canon and Nikon (Cankon). What might those changes look like? Here are 5 theories.

  • More Artificial Intelligence - This actually fights the battle on two fronts: smartphones and Cankon.
  • Seamless Smartphone Communication - We evolve from sending our images to our smartphones to just having them there.
  • Lower Price Points - FOPS already has a bigger mirrorless community base, so they should be able to leverage those numbers to offer more affordable hardware.
  • More Creative Modes - When you look at applications such as Luminar featuring alluring filters such as Image Radiance and Orton Effect, imagine if those filters were built into your camera?
  • Innovative Body Design - Mirrorless brought back the retro look. But they have other design opportunities as well, especially MFT bodies that can use smaller form factors.

Canon and Nikon re-entering the mirrorless space with quality products does not signal phase two of the mirrorless revolution in of itself. What they have already done with their saber rattling is to reenergize FOPS to take more risks and push their innovation envelope even further. And those four companies will lead the second wave of mirrorless.

Still Waiting for my Canon Rebate

On the June 11, 2018 TDS Podcast I mentioned that "I'm Taking the Canon PIXMA PRO-100 Rebate Challenge" and had mailed in all the required documents for my $250 rebate. I just checked the mail today, July 23, and still no rebate in sight. Here's what did happen this week.

I was urged by some listeners to visit the rebate site and check my status. I couldn't figure how to do that exactly, so I initiated a chat with one of their staff members. I was instructed to send an email to canonrebates@acbcoop.com - I did so only July 18. On July 20, I received the following response from them:

"Good Afternoon, You claim was received and approved. Please allow 1-2 weeks for card to mail." I'll keep you posted.

Testing the Sony RX100 VI

I had a nice surprise last week when the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 VI ($1,200) showed up at my door. It's a beautiful little camera with a 1" sensor and a 24-200mm zoom lens with a max aperture of f/2.8.

I'm shooting with it now, and I'm hoping to have a report as early as next week. Stay tuned.

Thanks for the Podcast Reviews

I recently asked folks to post a review on iTunes if they were so inclined to freshen up our list. Big thanks to Murlach, flatmacsurf, JohnF from CT, Fastidious 1, and Brook Craven for chiming in. Each wrote informative comments that will be truly useful to potential listeners. Awesome!

Do You Have a Film Camera that Needs a Good Home?

Over the last year, I've received donations from TDS members who have film cameras that need a good home. What I do is inspect the items, repair and clean as I can, then list them in TheFilmCameraShop where I can find a good home for them. If you're interested in donating, please use the Contact Form on TheNimblePhotographer site. And thanks for you consideration!

Thanks to Bill Armon, and others who have previously contributed their gear to TheFilmCamerasShop.

Updates and Such

I've updated our Directory to Portfolios by TDS Photographers page. Stop by and see what your peers are publishing.

You can become a member of our Inner Circle by clicking on this link or by clicking on the Patreon tile that's on every page of The Digital Story.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

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I like the clean look of a white backdrop. For certain portraits, such as this springtime flower shot, they just look right.

Christina-White-Background.jpg "Christina with Flowers" - Photo by Derrick Story. Olympus OM-D E-M1 with Olympus 25mm f/1.2 prime lens.

The problem is, as any photographer knows who has hung a white sheet and snapped a few frames, is that the camera really doesn't see it that way. And suddenly your clean white backdrop looks dull and dingy.

I've tried all sorts of things, like bouncing lights directly off the background. But the system that finally gave me the results that I wanted turned out to be quite simple.

I started with a thin, white commercial backdrop that works with my frame system. I then placed a diffused light behind the material, illuminating it like a light box. Then, all I had to do was concentrate on the exposure for the subject herself.

If you're struggling with getting white backdrops looking bright and clean, consider this technique. It sure made my life easier.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.