Recently in Show Notes

  Page 1 of 71 in Show Notes  

This is The Digital Story Podcast #701, August 20, 2019. Today's theme is "The Art of Mistakes and Miscalculations." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Mistakes are sometimes in the eye of the beholder. An off-center subject may be viewed by one person as poor composition and seen as dynamic by another. After visiting the exhibition, Don't! Photography and the Art of Mistakes at SF MOMA, I have 5 techniques that can be dazzling to some folks and head-scratching to others. Tune in and see which camp you fall in to.

The Art of Mistakes and Miscalculations

I want to start by reading you the opening text to the exhibit at SF MOMA, because I think it frames this conversation well.

In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, proscriptive texts by self-proclaimed photography experts proliferated in amateur manuals and periodicals. The next generation saw the rise of photographers who challenged these rules and strictures.

Pairing modernist images by artists including Man Ray, Florence Henri, and Lisette Model with historical documents, this exhibition examines the shifting definitions of "good" and "bad" photography, while considering how tastes evolved during this transformative period for the medium.

BTW: This show runs through Dec. 1. So if you're in San Francisco, I highly recommend visiting MOMA and seeing it for yourself.

So here are five of these "mistakes" that could turn into real works of art.

5 Techniques that Could be Wonderful

  • Off-Framing - In the early days of photography, tripods were required because of the low sensitivity of photo medium. Compositions tended to squared up and realistic. But as film speeds increased and handheld photography became more common, so did composing mistakes and victories. One of my favorites is the 1956 image, "Little Man, Stepping Off a Cable Car" by Dorothea Lang.
  • Reflections - Shop windows, for example, can be perplexing for photographers. If you shoot straight on, you see yourself in the picture. From an angle, the surrounding environment appears in the shot. Many books recommended avoiding this situation all together. That is until more adventurous photographers began to integrate these reflections into their shots showing dual realities at once.
  • Motion Blur - Standard advice to prevent motion blur was to use faster film, adequate lighting, and increase the shutter speed. But later artists discovered that blur could actually convey motion or indicate speed. And to even get more creative, a blurred moving face could convey an emotional state.
  • Distortion - Photographers were instructed to not position an arm, hand, or leg closer to the lens than the other parts of the body because distortion would elongate or enlarge that body part. But then more adventurous artists discovered that they could create abstractions, similar to modern art techniques, that departed from making photographs always look realistic.
  • Lens Flare - Photographers were cautioned about pointing their lenses in the direction of strong light sources, such as a bright lamp or the sun, because it increased the chances of lens flare. But because of its unpredictable nature, art photographers embraced the technique and were eager to see how the effects of flare impacted their compositions.

Photography is an ever-evolving medium. And the rules are seldom adhered to for very long. And to be honest, sometimes images that feature these "mistakes" are far more interesting than the "perfect" ones.

New Course Offering: Podcast Skills

A course on podcasting has been the number 1 request for new workshop topics. And after some time thinking about the best way to make this happen, I've come up with a one day skills course that you can attend from home, or wherever you have an Internet connection.

This one day event will cover the following topics:

  • Recording Hardware
  • Editing Software
  • Concept and Creation
  • Essential Storytelling Techniques
  • Show Notes
  • Syndication and RSS Feeds
  • Getting Your Show on Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, Stitcher, and More
  • Adding Music to Your Show (and Where to Get It)
  • Editing Workflow
  • Promoting Your Podcast
  • The Ins and Outs of Advertising and Sponsorships

The topics will be divided into modules and presented live, and they will be recorded as movies as well. Each participant will receive the catalog of HD movies from the day as part of their tuition.

The course will include insider tips, best practice techniques, and multiple Q&A sessions. Each participant is also entitled to one follow up one-on-one session after the workshop to address questions unique to his or her goals.

The live course, set of recorded videos, and the follow up one-on-one session costs only $249. Inner Circle Members get a 10 percent discount on tuition.

The first two course dates are scheduled for October 12 and November 9, 2019. Participation is limited to 10 people per course, first come, first served. Registration is open now at How Do You Listen to Your Podcasts?. Pop over and let us know if you're a Spotify, Overcast, Apple Podcasts, or fan of some other platform for listening to your shows. Plus, it's fun to see what others are saying.

moma-1024.jpg

Alfred Stieglitz: 5 Random Don'ts

From the SF MOMA exhibit: Don't! Photography and the Art of Mistakes.

  • Don't believe you must be a pictorial photographer... Bad pictorial photography, like bad "art painting," is a crime.
  • Don't plagiarize if you can help it. It can't give you any real pleasure to know yourself akin to a thief.
  • Don't believe you became an artist the instant you received a gift Kodak on Christmas morning.
  • Don't believe that experts are born. They are the results of hard work.
  • Don't go through life with your eyes closed, even though you may have chosen photography as your vocation. The machine may see for you, but its eye is dead. Your eye should furnish it with life. But don't believe that all open eyes see. Seeing needs practice - just like photography itself.

PS: Don't believe I claim any originality for the above random remarks.

From Photographic Topics 7, January 1909.

Try LinkedIn Learning Free for 30 Days

  • Access 13,000+ expert-led courses Watch as many courses as you like - there's no limit. Dozens of new courses added each week across business, tech and creative. Courses available in English, French, German, Japanese, and Spanish.
  • Get personalized course recommendations based on your current job, skills, and what professionals like you are learning.
  • Watch anytime on your computer or phone Easily access and watch courses from your desktop or mobile device. Apps available for iOS and Android.
  • Earn a certificate when you complete a course Show off the new skills you've learned on your LinkedIn profile by earning a certificate for each course you've watched.
  • Practice with exercise files and quizzes Validate what you're learning with quizzes within courses, and download exercise files so you can practice while you learn.
  • Download to mobile app for offline viewing Download and watch courses on the LinkedIn Learning mobile app for internet-free viewing.
  • Access LinkedIn's Premium Career features.

You can get started today by clicking on this link to start your 30 day free trial.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Portfoliobox - Your PortfolioBox site is the best way to show off your best images.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #700, August 13, 2019. Today's theme is "Street Photography with the Canon G5X Mark II." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

The Canon G5X Mark II is compact enough to fit in your pants pocket, but it pairs a 24-120mm zoom lens with a 20.2 MP 1" Stacked CMOS Sensor. That's a lot of imaging potential in a small package. And it seemed to me worthy of serious street photography. So I headed off to South San Francisco to see what it could do. I share my findings on today's TDS Photography Podcast.

Street Photography with the Canon G5X Mark II

Canon-G5X-Front-1024.jpg

You may be wondering why my first inclination for the Canon G5X was for street photography. Well, the answer came within minutes of my exploration of South San Francisco with the camera.

I was photographing a fabulous neon blue hotel sign downtown when a middle-aged man came storming out the front door calling to me, "What are you doing? What are you doing!"

I lowered the camera and turned to him, "I'm taking pictures of that sign."

"Why are you doing that?" he asked with way too much intensity.

"Because I like the way it looks," I responded. "I'm just having fun. Look," I said holding the diminutive Canon G5X up to his face. "Just having fun."

"Well, OK," he said begrudgingly and went back inside.

We have come to the point where we can't take a picture of a hotel sign on a public street without an inquiry as to our intentions. And one of the reasonable lines of defenses against this unreasonable behavior is a small camera that looks like something only a tourist would carry.

That's why I thought the G5X was a good choice for the day. And as it turns out, I was right.

After a week of steady shooting with the Canon, there are five features that I think are worth discussing for those interested in a compact camera for travel, street photography, and family outings. Let's dig deeper.

S. SF Ex Phone Booth

5 Noteworthy Features on the Canon G5X Mark II

  • Electronic 2,360,000 dot Viewfinder and Tilting 3" 1,040,000 dot LCD - The popup viewfinder works well for both left and right eye photographers. Once popped up, the eyepiece pulls outward providing plenty of viewing distance. This adjustable diopter is a great touch, and the image is outstanding. The tilting LCD is wonderful for street photography when you want to get low or high angles. This tandem really makes this a versatile, easy to use camera.
  • Front Control Ring for More Precise Zooming - The adjustable ring around the lens can be programmed as a step zoom with click stops for 24mm, 28mm, 35mm, 50mm, 85mm, 100mm, and 120mm. Since I'm already familiar with those focal lengths, I found this far more useful than just randomly pushing a rocker switch in one direction or the other to adjust the zoom.
  • Easy to Use Exposure Compensation Ring - If you enable Exposure Simulation, you can take full advantage of the easy to adjust exposure compensation ring that provides real time visual feedback as your rotate it with your thumb.
  • Relatively Fast f/1.8 - 2.8 Zoom lens - Not only is the zoom range good - 24mm to 120mm - so is the maximum aperture ranging from f/1.8 - 2.8. This makes it easier to capture images in a variety of lighting environments without having to jack up the ISO.
  • Versatile Charging Options - In-camera battery charging, from a power bank, outlet, or computer, is possible via the USB port. And unlike many other cameras that allow for USB charging, Canon also includes the standalone charger in the box. So you have both options available.

Stanford Mall Shopping

I do have a few nits as well. The battery indicator is less than accurate. It may show half charge available one minute, then suddenly shut down the next. The back panel controls are too easy to accidentally change during the shooting process. And I would love to have a custom function button or two.

But overall, I really like the Canon G5X Mark II ($899). The imaging pipeline produces excellent shots, there's a bounty of useful features, and the body is truly compact. It's a winner!

The B&H Deal of the Week

Panasonic Lumix G 25mm f/1.7 ASPH. Lens with UV Filter for Micro Four Thirds

The Panasonic Lumix G 25mm f/1.7 lens is on sale for $147.99 - that's $100 off.

One UHR (Ultra-High Refractive Index) element pairs with two aspherical elements to reduce spherical aberrations and distortions for consistent edge-to-edge sharpness and illumination. A Nano Surface Coating has been applied, too, and helps to reduce flare and ghosting for increased contrast and color fidelity. The optical construction also helps to realize a compact overall form factor, measuring just 2"-long and weighing 4.4 oz. Benefitting both stills and video capture, this lens also incorporates a stepping motor for smooth, quiet autofocus performance that is compatible with Lumix cameras' high-speed contrast-detection focusing systems.

Great for both Panasonic and Olympus MFT cameras, especially at this price!

74 Samsung officially unveils 108MP ISOCELL Bright HMX mobile camera sensor

You can read the entire article here. Here's the scoop:

The ISOCELL Bright HMX is the first mobile sensor to feature a 1/1.33" size, according to Samsung, which says its Tetracell tech enables the HMX to 'imitate big-pixel sensors' for better quality 27MP images.

The 1/1.33" format equates to around 9.6 x 7.2mm, which is around 40% smaller than a 1"-type sensor, but nearly 3 times larger than the 1/2.5"-type chips in the many of smartphones. The Tetracell design, much like Sony's 'Quad Bayer' technology, places four pixels under each color of its color filter, making it easy to combine pixels to give better performance at 1/4 resolution, but also means additional processing needs to be done to attempt to replicate what a standard Bayer sensor would capture, if it had 108 megapixels.

New Course Offering: Podcast Skills

A course on podcasting has been the number one request for new workshop topics. And after some time thinking about the best way to make this happen, I've come up with a one day skills course that you can attend from home, or wherever you have an Internet connection.

This event will cover the following topics:

  • Recording Hardware
  • Editing Software
  • Concept and Creation
  • Essential Storytelling Techniques
  • Show Notes
  • Syndication and RSS Feeds
  • Getting Your Show on Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, Stitcher, and More
  • Adding Music to Your Show (and Where to Get It)
  • Editing Workflow
  • Promoting Your Podcast
  • The Ins and Outs of Advertising and Sponsorships

The topics will be divided into modules and presented live, and they will be recorded as movies as well. Each participant will receive the catalog of HD movies from the day as part of their tuition.

The course will include insider tips, best practice techniques, and multiple Q&A sessions. Each participant is also entitled to one follow up one-on-one session after the workshop to address questions unique to his or her goals.

The live course, set of recorded videos, and the follow up one-on-one session costs only $249. Inner Circle Members get a 10 percent discount on tuition.

The first two course dates are scheduled for October 12 and November 9, 2019. Participation is limited to 10 people per course, first come, first served. Registration is open now at www.thenimblephotographer.com. Click on the 2019 Workshops tab.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Portfoliobox - Your PortfolioBox site is the best way to show off your best images.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #699, August 6, 2019. Today's theme is "How to Defeat Routine." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

My favorite definition of routine is by Merriam-Webster, which says "habitual or mechanical performance of an established procedure." As we do something over and over, our brains can take shortcuts because we're familiar with the sequence of steps, such as taking a picture. And this certainly can dampen our creativity. But today we will restore vitality to our photography in 5 easy steps.

How to Defeat Routine

Don't get me wrong. There are moments in my life when I like routine. Mornings are an example. I don't want to reinvent the first hour of my day. I want it to be as mindless as possible. Feed the cat, pour the coffee, check email - it's all I can handle before 6am.

I also like my first 30 minutes at work. Unpack my bag, once again feed the cat (a different one this time), make another cup of coffee, read the day's news, post online, have breakfast. I truly enjoy this. The joy of routine is that it's easy on the brain. I can gently work up to my day, and by 8:30am or so, be operating at full capacity.

But routine can work against us as well. It can dampen our enthusiasm for romance, stifle innovation, and dull our creativity.

As photographers, we work so hard to master the steps that lead to professional image making. We learn about exposure, color, motion, composition, depth of field, focal length and more. These tools of the trade are important. But we often make a critical mistake once we're comfortable with them. Instead of springing headfirst into the creative unknown, we rely on our ability to make an image that's simply good enough.

Unlike our morning coffee, we must resist this urge to operate on autopilot. And here are five ways to to defeat routine.

5 Ways to Defeat Routine

highway-1080.jpg

  • Get in the Car and Go Somewhere - Most of us can set aside a day for a road trip. Make it happen. Go somewhere and experience a change of scenery. It's invigorating.
  • Try a New Lens - Whether you rent or buy, it makes little difference. But a new optic is a new way to see the world. Go wide, go long, run into the darkness with a wide aperture.
  • Work with New People - During my scouting trip, I had lunch in Eureka with Richard. He's a local, but he's attending our Humboldt Redwoods Workshop. Why? "Because I want to see this scenery through new eyes, the eyes of those attending the workshop." Working with new photographers is both amazing and invigorating.
  • Design a Photo Challenge - People love the assignments that I give them on our workshops. But you can create them for yourself as well. Challenge yourself to shoot with a new technique for the day, such as HDR. Often this opens up the passages for other creative perspectives.
  • Shoot in Manual Exposure Mode - Setting the exposure mode is at the beginning of most of our photo routines. So by disrupting the first step, you change the entire sequence, thereby forcing your brain to kick in to gear again.

Routine helps us conserve our energy to get through the day. But do not let it become the day, especially when we're making pictures. Fight back and surprise yourself with something fresh and new.

New Course Offering: Podcast Skills

A course on podcasting has been the number one request for new workshop topics. And after some time thinking about the best way to make this happen, I've come up with a one day skills course that you can attend from home, or wherever you have an Internet connection.

This event will cover the following topics:

  • Recording Hardware
  • Editing Software
  • Concept and Creation
  • Essential Storytelling Techniques
  • Show Notes
  • Syndication and RSS Feeds
  • Getting Your Show on Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, Stitcher, and More
  • Adding Music to Your Show (and Where to Get It)
  • Editing Workflow
  • Promoting Your Podcast
  • The Ins and Outs of Advertising and Sponsorships

The topics will be divided into modules and presented live, and they will be recorded as movies as well. Each participant will receive the catalog of HD movies from the day as part of their tuition.

The course will include insider tips, best practice techniques, and multiple Q&A sessions. Each participant is also entitled to one follow up one-on-one session after the workshop to address questions unique to his or her goals.

The live course, set of recorded videos, and the follow up one-on-one session costs only $249. Inner Circle Members get a 10 percent discount on tuition.

The first two course dates are scheduled for October 12 and November 9, 2019. Participation is limited to 10 people per course, first come, first served. Registration is open now at www.thenimblephotographer.com. Click on the 2019 Workshops tab.

New Nimble Interview: Chuck Leavell, Keyboardist for the Rolling Stones

An interview with musician Chuck Leavell, whose journey began with Allman Brothers Band, and who is currently touring with the Rolling Stones on their No Filter tour. In this conversation, Chuck talks about the Stones, Eric Clapton's unplugged album, his work as a writer, and his definition of success.

The entire conversation is terrific. I think you will enjoy what Chuck has to say. To ensure that you don't miss any of the podcasts, I recommend that you subscribe to The Nimble Photographer Podcast on Apple Podcast, Stitcher, Google Play, or wherever you tune in.

Sony Cyber-shot RX100 VII: What you need to know

You can read the entire article here. Here's the scoop:

The Sony Cyber-shot RX100 VII is, as the name suggests, the seventh completely new model in the company's pocketable large sensor zoom compact series. Like 2018's Mark VI, the VII is a 1" sensor pocket superzoom, with a lens that stretches from a wide-angle of 24mm equiv up to the telephoto realms of 200mm equiv at the long end.

Like its predecessor, it features a stacked CMOS sensor with DRAM storage built into the chip itself, allowing it to buffer the data it so quickly reads out from its sensor. But the main thing the latest camera brings is updated autofocus capability and usability, which could prove to be bigger steps forward than it might sound.

The Sony Cyber-shot RX100 VII is available for preorder for $1,198 and should ship by the end of the month.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Portfoliobox - Your PortfolioBox site is the best way to show off your best images.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #698, July 30, 2019. Today's theme is "Ding-Dong - It's the Ring Video Doorbell." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

I have a Ring Video Doorbell mounted by the front door of my studio. 24 hours a day it watches and listens for activity within its 180 degree field of view. It's like a mini-Truman Show for my neighborhood. And it's far and away the most unique form of photography that I currently use. More about my first week with the Ring Video Doorbell in today's TDS podcast.

Ding-Dong - It's the Ring Video Doorbell

I bought the Ring Video Doorbell with HD Video on sale at Amazon. I had no idea if I was going to like it or find it useful in any way.

If you're not familiar with this device, it works like this. You mount it near your front door where is uses a 180 degree video camera and audio to monitor activity. It can detect motion and stream live video day and night.

Ring-View-1024.jpg

Ring connects to your router, and you connect to it via the Ring app that is available for computers, smartphones, and tablets. Once everything is connected, you can view the world outside your front door at anytime through its live feed, or be notified of activity via its motion sensors. It works quite well.

For me, the photographer, it's an inexpensive, but powerful remote camera that not only monitor the wilds outside my front door, but records it and saves the movies for viewing at a later time.

ring-device-1024.jpg

This is like something out of a crime show. And I find it fascinating. You can purchase your own Ring Video Doorbell for as little as $99 on Amazon.com.

New Nimble Interview: Chuck Leavell, Keyboardist for the Rolling Stones

An interview with musician Chuck Leavell, whose journey began with Allman Brothers Band, and who is currently touring with the Rolling Stones on their No Filter tour. In this conversation, Chuck talks about the Stones, Eric Clapton's unplugged album, his work as a writer, and his definition of success. Here's an excerpt from the show.

The entire conversation is terrific. I think you will enjoy what Chuck has to say. To ensure that you don't miss any of the podcasts, I recommend that you subscribe to The Nimble Photographer Podcast on Apple Podcast, Stitcher, Google Play, or wherever you tune in.

Stranger Things Fan Goes Viral for Not Knowing what a Darkroom Is

You can read the entire article here. Here are some of my favorite passages:

A young fan of the popular Netflix show Stranger Things earned a bit of Internet fame (or is it infamy?) this weekend when they asked a question about that strange "red room" in the show where Jonathan goes "to 'refine' his photos or something." In other words: a darkroom.

Of course, it didn't take long before someone saw the post and shared it on Twitter alongside the caption "*crumbles further into dust*" to highlight just how old this question made them feel: And thus, a meme was born. The screenshot quickly showed up on Imgur, Reddit's /r/memes subreddit, and then got picked up by international news outlets. Meanwhile, responses to the Tweet above--which has been liked over 61K times and retweeted over 13K times--began pouring in:

Several of the commenters were also quite harsh, calling the original fan "dumb as rocks" and stereotyping all young people as stupid. But we prefer to look on the positive side of this story. As Twitter user Chris Wood wrote, "Hey, give the kid credit for being willing to ask."

Not that this stopped us from feeling like dinosaurs or relics of a bygone age, but look on the bright side: a whole lot of kids who would not have had the courage to ask this question now know the answer. Here's hoping a few of them pick up a roll of film and give the darkroom a try.

Update on My Kickstarter Projects

Speaking of film processing: I received my daylight Lab Box and will soon start testing it. I have a bottle of single bath chemistry ordered from Jeremiah's Photo Corner, and soon I will process my first roll of B&W film.

I also received this notice today from the Kamlan Optics folks:

Finally, The shipping for is coming ! We are about to ship from Aug. Here are some updates before that.
1. Manufacturing is quite fluent.We will post some pictures later.
2. We plan to close the option of shipping address change on July 31st. Please make according change before that date if your shipping address is different from what you have entered.
3. As the survey can only be sent once, we can't send survey for a 2nd time. For those we still can't find the survey, please enter the shipping information here.
4. We plan to complete the refund process for return backers in 7 days from now on.
5. No custom fee will be charged for EU customers this time,

So they seem to be on track as well.

Do You Have a Film Camera that Needs a Good Home?

Over the last year, I've received donations from TDS members who have film cameras that need a good home. What I do is inspect the items, repair and clean as I can, then list them in TheFilmCameraShop where I can find a good home for them. If you're interested in donating, please use the Contact Form on TheNimblePhotographer site. And thanks for you consideration!

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Portfoliobox - Your PortfolioBox site is the best way to show off your best images.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #697, July 23, 2019. Today's theme is "Protect Yourself from Smash and Grab." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Photography gear can pack a lot of value into a compact, easy to carry bag. And for that reason, it's become a popular target for thieves looking to grab a big payday at your expense. Given that these rip-offs can happen in just the blink of an eye, what can you do to put the odds in your favor? I'll cover a few strategies in today's TDS Photography Podcast.

Protect Yourself from Smash and Grab

tow-truck.jpg

Here's a real life story that just happened:

"Hey Derrick. I'm going to buy the Ricoh GR III after all, but for a really crappy reason. On my way back from Bodega Bay I stopped in SF for gas. There was a bar & grille across the way, so I parked and had dinner. In that time, someone smashed a window and reached into the SUV's trunk and grabbed two bags. Not even a "bad" neighborhood, judging by appearances. Near Moscone Center."

"So...gone are my camera gear, memory cards, and laptop. As the great philosopher Mark Knopfler said, Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the big. C'est la vie! So the good news is that everything was insured (scheduled personal property on my homeowners policy). Hence, a new GR III. And an Olympus too, of course. Hey, I'm going to remember a good week with you and everybody, and forget the ugly event at the end."

A while later, John sent me this email.

Around 20 years ago a photographer I know was walking on the shore near Otter Cliffs in Acadia Nat'l Park. "It was level ground," he told me. He stepped on a rock and because of the sand on the sole of his hiking boot, he slipped. His expensive Nikon zoom lens and body crashed on the rock. Destroyed. Two days later, he had a check from his homeowners insurance company for the full amount.

He told me, "Get insurance."

I did.

Just last year, I met a photographer who was on a workshop on the coast of Massachusetts. She and her friends went to a seafood restaurant for dinner. When they walked back to their car, they found a smashed window and probably $10k of gear gone. The parking lot attended said he didn't see anything. Sadly, the photographer I spoke to didn't have the gear insured. That is tragic!

Here's what I'd recommend to any of your listeners: call the insurance agency where you bought renters or homeowners insurance. I'm talking about the local agent (not the insurance company). Call the agency and say, I have some camera gear I want to insure. Can you give me a quote, please?

They'll ask for the value of your gear (add it up), and give you a quote.

I have $3,000 worth of gear, and the coverage costs me $68 per year. Now there's a nice surprise: for some reason, items covered on scheduled personal property do NOT have a deductible. Amazing, right? That's how my friend got full replacement value for his smashed Nikon body + lens.

Hey, insurance is a boring subject, yes, but let's face it, bad luck happens!

Here's what I did:

For my personal gear, I have $15,000 insured via a rider to my homeowner's insurance with USAA. I set it up via my account on their website. It took me about 30 minutes. The cost is $194 per year, or $16.16 per month. And just like John said, there's no deductible.

Best Ways to Protect Your Gear

  • Insure It - Because despite our best precautions, bad things do happen. You can insure your gear for a reasonable amount. And at the end of the day, this is your best safety net.
  • Keep It Out of Sight - SUVs in particular provide lots of visibility into the vehicle. Keep not only your valuables out of sight, but everything else as well. Don't provide even the slightest visual temptation to break into your car.
  • Keep It with You - Nimble photographers definitely have an advantage in this area. But if you do go into a restaurant or convenience store for even a short while, take your bag with you.
  • Prepare for Risky Situations - When we were photographing the French Quarter at dusk, we hired an off-duty officer to accompany us. And even then, we kept our gear to a minimum and out of sight as much as possible.
  • Lock It Up at Home - Once you've returned home, secure your equipment in a locking cabinet or safe. This level of protection doesn't ensure its safety, but it will slow down intruders. And sometimes that's enough to deter them.

It's sobering to contemplate that we have to even consider such measures when exposing our cameras to the world. But the truth is, we may lose it all if we don't. Take the proper measures so you can continue to enjoy you artistic pursuits with all of the gear that you've worked so hard to acquire.

Major CASE Act Copyright Legislation Passed by Senate Judiciary Committee

You can read the entire article here. Here are some of my favorite passages:

The CASE Act, a major piece of legislation that would introduce a small claims court for copyright infringement cases, has officially been passed by Senate Judiciary Committee, clearing the way for a full vote on the Senate floor.

This is a major step forward for the copyright legislation, which was introduced by a bi-partisan group of senators from Louisiana, North Carolina, Illinois and Hawaii. As of now, defending your copyrights means taking your case to federal court--a complicated and expensive proposition. If passed, the CASE Act would remedy this by establishing a small claims tribunal within the U.S. Copyright Office, making it much easier and cheaper to defend your copyrights in court.

The unappealable court would be staffed by three full-time "Copyright Claims Officers" appointed by the Librarian of Congress, who would be allowed to assign damages of up to $15,000 per infringed work, and up to $30,000 total.

Passing out of committee is a big step for the CASE Act, but the fight to establish a small claims court in the US Copyright Office is far from over. The bill will now go to the Senate floor for a full vote, while the House version continues to move through the House of Representatives.

Do You Have a Film Camera that Needs a Good Home?

Over the last year, I've received donations from TDS members who have film cameras that need a good home. What I do is inspect the items, repair and clean as I can, then list them in TheFilmCameraShop where I can find a good home for them. If you're interested in donating, please use the Contact Form on TheNimblePhotographer site. And thanks for you consideration!

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! I will announce the winner of the Smartphone Photo Challenge this week. Stay tuned.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Portfoliobox - Your PortfolioBox site is the best way to show off your best images.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #696, July 16, 2019. Today's theme is "5 Ways to Go Beyond the Postcard Shot." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Over the last couple weeks, I've been scouting locations for our Sonoma Coast Exploration Workshop. And I can't tell you how beautiful the landscape is here. In such environments, it's easy to just take pretty pictures. But our workshop crew is going to push beyond that. And in today's show, I'll share 5 of my favorite ways to do that.

5 Ways to Go Beyond the Postcard Shot

It's interesting. When I'm scouting locations, I have to move quickly and work efficiently. I typically use my Fujifilm XF10 for scouting because it fits in my pocket and renders beautiful big shots.

Quiet-Cove-1024-V2.jpg "Quiet Cove" - Fujifilm XF10, ISO 200, 1/500th at f/5.6. Photo by Derrick Story.

By the time the workshop begins, I have quite a collection of pretty pictures. They're great to have. But one of their unexpected purposes is to help me think about different ways to render those scenes. So they're helpful for not only location, but for technique.

I then share those techniques with the workshop crew before they go out to shoot. Yes, I want them to capture the postcard shots, but I don't want them to stop there. This is the opportunity to keep pushing creatively.

After examining my latest catalog of scouting images, here are 5 of the techniques I'm going to recommend.

5 Creative Techniques

  • Long Exposure Water - This one is a natural for the Sonoma Coast. Active tide combines with rocky coastline make for wonderful long exposure images. Tripod, ND filter, and cable release. Here's the bonus tip, however, use the mobile app Spectre to preview the image before setting up. You can handhold a Spectre shot on an iPhone, and if you like it, then set up and record the high resolution version with your camera.
  • Black & White - Mirrorless cameras, in particular, are including some dynamite B&W modes that are perfect for costal landscape. True, you can convert in post. But I find it far more stimulating to shoot in RAW+Jpeg using one of these dynamic filters.
  • High Dynamic Range - We have ample lab time during the workshop, so working true HDR is a great option. Don't use the HDR that your camera processes, bracket exposures and really work in on the computer. Knowing that you'll be able to handle extreme contrast allows you to really get creative in the field.
  • Multi Exposure - Many mirrorless cameras, DSLRs, and even 35mm film bodies have this capability. I think it makes more sense for digital because you can experiment with abandon. The results can be unique and quite compelling.
  • Art Filters - Seems like we never have time to fully explore the various art filters on our cameras. But there can be film emulation, dramatic tone, faded colors, sepia, and lots and lots more. If you shoot RAW+Jpeg, you can experiment all you want and still have the RAW file as a safety net.

Postcard images do have their place in our photo libraries. And some viewers prefer them to more artistic endeavors. But the opportunity to really hit it out of the park comes when we push the creative envelope. That's what we'll be doing next week. Hope I've inspired you to do the same.

New Nimble Podcast - Photographer Shelby Knick

In the podcast titled From Outside the Fence to In, Shelby talks about her first interview to apprentice with a pro photographer for motor sports. I thought you might enjoy this anecdote.

The entire conversation is terrific. I think you will enjoy what Shelby has to say. To ensure that you don't miss any of the podcasts, I recommend that you subscribe to The Nimble Photographer Podcast on Apple Podcast, Stitcher, Google Play, or where every you tune in.

f/1.4 vs f/1.8: Can You Actually Tell the Difference?

You can read the entire article here. Here are some of my favorite passages:

Given how much more it costs to buy an f/1.4 prime compared to an f/1.8, beginners in particular often ask if the upgrade is worth it. Build quality and optical quality being equal, is the difference in light gathering capability and depth of field noticeable? Can you really tell?

Photographer and YouTuber Pierre Lambert decided to do a blind "taste test" so to speak and find out if his viewers could actually tell the difference between photos shot at multiple locations at both f/1.4 and f/1.8, with a few shots taken at f/2.8, f/4 and f/5.6 thrown in just for fun.

From wide shots to street photos to tighter compositions with plenty of bokeh to analyze, he captured a total of 7 locations. Here's just one of those comparisons. Can you tell which is which?

Do You Have a Film Camera that Needs a Good Home?

Over the last year, I've received donations from TDS members who have film cameras that need a good home. What I do is inspect the items, repair and clean as I can, then list them in TheFilmCameraShop where I can find a good home for them. If you're interested in donating, please use the Contact Form on TheNimblePhotographer site. And thanks for you consideration!

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Portfoliobox - Your PortfolioBox site is the best way to show off your best images.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #695, July 9, 2019. Today's theme is "My Kickstarter Batting Average." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

There are a variety of projects to back on Kickstarter, but many of them seem particularly alluring to photographers. Exotic lenses, innovative cameras, and a cornucopia of creative accessories keep our fingers poised over the "Back this Project" button. But how many of these actually live up to their promise? Today, I'll share my personal batting average from over the last 5 years. I hope you enjoy the show.

My Kickstarter Batting Average

kickstarter-Lens.jpg

The latest project that I just couldn't resist was the Kamlan 50mm F1.1 MK2 Prime Lens for Mirrorless Cameras. Promoted as the new "Bokeh Beast," the project garnered 1,229 backers pledging $267,603 to bring this lens to life.

I've paid $199 for a MFT version that I'm hoping will be delivered by year's end, even though the Kamlan folks are hoping to start shipping in August. Which touches on the first thing that I've learned about Kickstarter projects: they rarely ship on time.

Most endeavors do a reasonably good job of keeping us informed along the way. As a result, I've learned much about the challenges of producing large quantities of complicated machined products. It's tough, and it always seems harder than the creators initially calculate.

That being said, I've received most of what I signed up for over the last five years. And I thought that you might be interested in my particular track record as you contemplate your own potential pledges.

5 Years of Kickstarter Projects

Hasselnuts-back.jpg

  • Total Projects Pledged: 15 - One of my early projects in 2013 was the "Hasselnuts: Hasselblad Camera + iPhone DigitalBack Kit!" I had a Hasselblad 500C at the time that I wasn't using very much, and I was intrigued by this iPhone digital back adapter for it. I pledged $219 for it, received it after many delays, and it worked - for my iPhone 4S. Unfortunately Apple kept changing the iPhone dimensions, rendering my cool Hassey back woefully outdated. You see, they didn't really plan to accommodate different phone dimensions. I ended up selling the 500C. I still have the Hasselnuts.
  • Total Projects Delivered to Date - 9 - Back in 2013, I was pretty excited about The Lomography Smartphone Film Scanner. One again, I was hooked on the idea of using my iPhone as a digitizer to add images directly to my iCloud account. For my $55, I did receive the film scanner. And I still have, though I don't use it much because of its poor image quality. If I would have really thought this one through, I probably could have predicted its performance. And I haven't revisited it with my iPhone X. Maybe I should.
  • Projects Promised that I'm Still Waiting for - 4 - Of the bunch, the one that I'm most excited about is LAB-BOX - The first multi-format daylight-loading film tank. Originally, this project was slated for delivery in Sept. 2017. They have finally begun shipping, and I may have mine by Sept. 2019. This device would allow me to process film in complete daylight. No darkroom required. If it works as promised, it will save me a ton of money in processing costs. I'll keep you posted.
  • Projects that did not Reach their Funding Goal - 2 - One that I was really pulling for was the KOBRA Flash Modifier System. But they only raised $37,296 of their $125,000 goal. So the project wasn't funded. They rebooted and tried again, and it looks like they met their goal the second time. But I lost interest and have no idea how it all turned out.
  • Potential Batting Average of .867 - If my outstanding projects deliver, I'm looking pretty good. And even if none of the outstanding projects never make it to my mailbox, I'm still batting a cool .600.

So, by now you're probably wondering what my favorite Kickstarter project has been. Of the ones delivered, I use the Lume Cube flash and video light the most. It's super handy. And I can take it underwater for snorkeling as well.

I still have high hopes for Lab-Box and the Kamlan 50mm F1.1 lens. We shall see.

New Nimble Podcast - Photographer Shelby Knick

In the podcast titled From Outside the Fence to In, Shelby talks about her first interview to apprentice with a pro photographer for motor sports. I thought you might enjoy this anecdote.

The entire conversation is terrific. I think you will enjoy what Shelby has to say. To ensure that you don't miss any of the podcasts, I recommend that you subscribe to The Nimble Photographer Podcast on Apple Podcast, Stitcher, Google Play, or whereever you tune in.

This Famed LA Ice Cream Truck Has Started Charging 'Influencers' Double

You can read the entire article here. Here are some of my favorite passages:

The CVT Soft Serve truck is an LA institution with a 15-year history, but its reputation comes with a downside. Owner Joe Nicchi is increasingly bombarded with requests for free ice cream in exchange for "exposure" on Instagram.

The owner reached his limit last week, when he tells VICE that an unnamed influencer asked him to work an event for 300 people... for exposure. That's when he announced a new policy through (ironically) the truck's Instagram account: anybody who asks for a $4 ice cream cone for free will pay $8.

"We truly don't care if you're an Influencer, or how many followers you have," reads the caption. "We will never give you a free ice cream in exchange for a post on your social media page." #InfluencersAreGross

Dynapak MKI Presets And Profiles Aim to Enhance M4/3 RAW Files

You can read the entire article here. Here are some of my favorite passages:

The Dynapak MKI profiles and presets pack has been designed to help Micro Four Thirds users get big, bold colors, and better dynamic range from the small sensors. The color profiles that come with the bundle have been created to work with Adobe's Camera Raw software and Adobe's Lightroom. The profiles help the software get closer to the light-data that has been captured by the camera's sensor, which in turn should allow for more dynamic range, and much deeper, more vibrant colors than you could get without the profiles in place.

The bundle also comes with 11 creative presets, a Dynapak MKI training video that will help get the most out of the profiles, and free updates forever. The Dynapak MKI Profiles and Presets bundle will work with Camera Raw, Lightroom Classic, Lightroom CC and Lightroom CC mobile so you can edit while you're on the road. The Bundle is available now for $60. Head on over to Dynapak MKI Product Page for more information.

Do You Have a Film Camera that Needs a Good Home?

Over the last year, I've received donations from TDS members who have film cameras that need a good home. What I do is inspect the items, repair and clean as I can, then list them in TheFilmCameraShop where I can find a good home for them. If you're interested in donating, please use the Contact Form on TheNimblePhotographer site. And thanks for you consideration!

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Portfoliobox - Your PortfolioBox site is the best way to show off your best images.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #694, July 2, 2019. Today's theme is "Are Your Cloud Storage Costs Out of Control?" I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

I had just completed a job in Adobe Lightroom when this notice flashed on my screen, "You've used your 20 GBs of storage. Would you like to upgrade your plan?" Where have I seen that before? Oh yeah, with every other service that I'm currently using. Then it dawned on me: "How much am I spending for online storage?" The answer is the topic of today's TDS Photography Podcast.

Are Your Cloud Storage Costs Out of Control?

clouds-1024-web.jpg

It's funny how I have thoughts in the back of my head that I don't act upon, until there's some sort of tipping point. In this case, that moment was when I ran out of space for my current Adobe Photography Plan that includes Lightroom, Photoshop, and 20 GBs of storage for $10 a month.

I had just been notified that my Dropbox plan would increase $20 a month upon renewal. And I had just ponied up for another year of Flickr Pro. Then there's Smugmug, Apple iCloud, and probably others that I can't even remember right now. How much am I spending on Cloud storage? Well, here's a breakdown.

Current Cloud Storage Costs per Year

  • $120 - Adobe Photography Plan - Includes 20 GBs of storage, plus access to Lightroom and Photoshop. Could upgrade ti 1 TB plan for $240 a year with a $60 discount for the first year.
  • $120 - Apple iCloud - Plan includes 2 TBs or storage for my photos and other files in the Apple ecosystem.
  • $120 - Dropbox - Just raised their rates and doubled our storage space. I will have another 2 TBs there if I renew.
  • $49 - Flickr Pro - Unlimited photo storage, ad free browsing, and access to all of Flickr's services.
  • $72 - Smugmug account - I'm not really sure of the storage limitations here. But to this point, I haven't received any additional notices.
  • $83 - Portfoliobox Pro - 1000 images and unlimited pages, plus custom domain and publishing platform.

If I renew all of these plans, my total will be $564 a year, breaking down to $47 a month. Now keep in mind, this doesn't include web site fees, domain name renewals, Internet costs, mobile phone subscriptions, etc.

Upcoming Nimble Interview - Filmmaker Joanna James

Joanna is a filmmaker and directed the movie, "A Fine Line." In her interview, she takes us behind the scenes of independent filmmaking. It's an interview you don't want to miss. Look for it later this week.

To ensure that you don't miss any of the podcasts, I recommend that you subscribe to The Nimble Photographer Podcast on Apple Podcast, Stitcher, Google Play, or where every you tune in.

How Mirrorless Cameras Are Changing the Game for Photojournalists

You can read the entire article here. Here are some of my favorite passages:

One of the best features of mirrorless cameras is their ability to shoot totally silently thanks to the lack of a mechanical mirror. That feature turned out to be a great boon to a photojournalist at the recent Democratic debate, allowing him to shoot in a position where others couldn't.

The Sony a9 is known for its electronic shutter with fast readout and no viewfinder blackout, which allows photographers to shoot in complete silence. For New York Times photographer Doug Mills, that became a great advantage at the recent Democratic debate.

It turns out that the sound of the DSLRs used by other photojournalists was picked up by the broadcast microphones, leading NBC to tell them to only shoot during audience applause. When Mills was brought to the side of the stage for his turn, he was told he couldn't shoot, but he quickly explained that his camera didn't make any noise, leading the NBC tech to remark that such cameras should be standard for all photojournalists.

If you've ever listened to any live political event, you've probably heard the constant clatter of DSLRs, so surely, an eventual migration to mirrorless cameras would be beneficial in that sense. Nonetheless, press companies are deeply invested in Canon and Nikon cameras and lenses, so such a change won't happen overnight.

Do You Have a Film Camera that Needs a Good Home?

Over the last year, I've received donations from TDS members who have film cameras that need a good home. What I do is inspect the items, repair and clean as I can, then list them in TheFilmCameraShop where I can find a good home for them. If you're interested in donating, please use the Contact Form on TheNimblePhotographer site. And thanks for you consideration!

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Portfoliobox - Your PortfolioBox site is the best way to show off your best images.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #693, June 25, 2019. Today's theme is "5 Things that I Like About the Panasonic Lumix DC-G95 (and 2 I don't)." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

When I first picked up the Panasonic Lumix DC-G95, I loved the way it felt in my right hand. The grip is substantial, the body light, and my lenses balanced nicely on the camera. And there's a lot beneath the surface to appreciate as well. Today, I share my 5 favorite features and a couple complaints. I hope you enjoy the show.

5 Things that I Like About the Panasonic Lumix DC-G95 (and 2 I don't)

IMG_4540.jpg

Even though Olympus and Panasonic share the same Micro Four Thirds mount, they tend to be very different cameras. Olympus favors supremely flexible, if not at times confusing, operating systems housed in their classic design aesthetic. Panasonic, on the other hand, sports a more modern look and prides itself in both still photography and video. In that sense, the G95 is the archetypal Panasonic MFT camera.

It captures beautiful 20 MP stills one moment, then outstanding HD or 4K video the next. It's equipped to handle both with equal ease and sophistication. Here's a look at its basic specs.

Noteworthy Specifications

  • 20.3MP Digital Live MOS Sensor
  • UHD 4K 30p Video (not time limits), Pre-Installed V-LogL gamma profile (8-bit only)
  • 5-Axis Sensor Stabilization; Dual I.S. 2
  • 0.74x 2.36m-Dot OLED Viewfinder
  • 3.0" 1.24m-Dot Free-Angle Touchscreen
  • DFD AF System (49 areas)
  • ISO 25600 and 9 fps Continuous Shooting
  • Bluetooth LE and Wi-Fi Connectivity
  • 3 Control Dials
  • Built-in Flash
  • Dust and Splash Resistant
  • 1 SD Card Slot (UHS-II)

Five Things that I Do Like

All in all, very good specs. But after shooting with the camera for a month, here are five things that I really appreciated about it.

  • High Quality Image Files - I processed the RW2 files in Adobe Lightroom, and was quite pleased with their out of the camera color, tonality, and crispness. The photos had excellent character. And the camera did an excellent job of capturing quality pictures in a variety of lighting conditions.
  • L.Monochrome D - If you like rich B&W photography, you will love L.Monochrome D on the G95. It is gorgeous, and if you're capturing RAW+Jpegs, I doubt you'll ever look at the RAWs unless you need a color version of the shot.
  • Perfect Location for the Mic Port - One thing that has drove me crazy with my Olympus cameras was the positioning of the mic port. It was in direct conflict with the articulated screen. Panasonic has moved their port to the upper left of the camera. It's out of the way of the screen, and in perfect position for a hot shoe mounted microphone.
  • Excellent Creative Tools - The in-camera HDR is quite good, as is 4K Photo, multiple exposure, time lapse, panorama, focus stacking, and serious in-camera RAW processing. Plus, Panasonic introduces Live View Composite with this model. Lots of good stuff for the creative photographer.
  • USB Charging - And you get a separate charger as well!

Two Things that I Don't Like

As for the two things that I certainly did not like:

First, the G95 is only available with the bundled Lumix G Vario 12-60mm f/3.5-5.6 zoom. So, instead of being able to buy the body alone for around $900, I have to spend $1,200 and get a zoom that I really don't want.

Second, even though this camera is touted as a robust hybrid, it has a substantial crop of 1.25X for the 4K video. So even when you're shooting at the wide end of the bundled 12-60mm zoom, in real life, about the widest you can go is 30mm (12mm x 2 x 1.25).

The only reasonable answer for this is a lack of processing power. For a camera that includes so many video-friendly features (mic port, headphones port, V-Log, multiple formats, sound adjustments, etc.), have this sever of a crop on the sensor just doesn't add up.

Bottom Line

I truly enjoyed shooting with the Panasonic Lumix DC-G95. It's comfortable to hold and produces wonderful images. The camera is packed full of creative features that can keep the artistic photographer busy to no end.

But considering the $1,200 price tag, I'd be tempted to wait for the Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III before making a buying decision. Once that camera is released, we'll be able to make a better buying decision for the advanced enthusiast class of photographer.

New Nimble Photographer Podcast - Musician George Shaw

As a young man, George Shaw flew from city to city for two years, cassette recorder in hand, with a question he posed to each music professional he interviewed: "How can music, and in particular improvisation, best be taught?" After studying their answers and writing a dissertation on this subject, Dr. Shaw applied what he learned to teaching music and improvisation at the college level.

Here's an excerpt from the show.

You can listen to the entire interview by visiting the Nimble Photographer site. The show is also available on Apple Music, on Google Play Music, and wherever you listen to your podcasts.

You Can Moan About Adobe but the Company Is Making More Money Than Ever

You can read the entire article here. Here are some of my favorite passages:

You may frequently hear complaints about Lightroom and Photoshop -- too buggy, too slow, too bloated, too expensive -- but it doesn't seem to be putting a dent in Adobe's performance. In fact, it's quite the opposite as the company announced last week that it has achieved record revenues for the second fiscal quarter of this year.

As reported in a press release last week, Adobe generated $2.74 billion in the second quarter of 2019, a record for the company and a growth of 25 percent year-over-year. The success is attributed to "the explosion of creativity across the globe," the need for companies to deliver "engaging customer experiences," and their "strong ecosystem of partners."

Many photographers have objected to the shift to a subscription-based model and given the complaints, you'd be forgiven for thinking that Lightroom is falling from favor in face of competition from Capture One and a growing assortment of alternatives such as ACDSee, Luminar and ON1. Photoshop is also seeing strong challenges from Affinity Photo and Pixelmator Pro.

Despite the anecdotal grievances, Adobe appears to be doing better than ever.

Do You Have a Film Camera that Needs a Good Home?

Over the last year, I've received donations from TDS members who have film cameras that need a good home. What I do is inspect the items, repair and clean as I can, then list them in TheFilmCameraShop where I can find a good home for them. If you're interested in donating, please use the Contact Form on TheNimblePhotographer site. And thanks for you consideration!

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Portfoliobox - Your PortfolioBox site is the best way to show off your best images.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #692, June 18, 2019. Today's theme is "You are More Influential than You Realize." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Engaged photographers, such as ourselves, take certain things for granted. We're current on the latest gear offerings, we understand the value of preparing for and capturing important moments in our lives, and we know that technology can instantly evaporate a lifetime of images just as easily as it enabled us to capture them in the first place. But not everyone understands these things as we do, and my thoughts on sharing our knowledge is the topic of today's podcast.

You are More Influential than You Realize

photographer-1024.jpg

Over the last four days, I've logged more than a thousand highway miles, attended two undergraduate graduation ceremonies, attended four celebration meals, two parties, and a music concert at Santa Barbara Bowl.

During all of those events, I had conversations with freshly minted college graduates, proud fathers, excited moms, and a variety of extended family members, friends, and strangers. Inevitably at some point in the conversation what I did for a living would surface, and the exchanges that followed fascinated me. And my primary takeaway was that we all could be doing more to help the casual photographers that we come in contact with. Here are five ways that I've observed.

  • Canon or Nikon? - An early question for me was, "Do you shoot Canon or Nikon?" When I responded that I typically shoot mirrorless cameras, the response was, "Oh, I've never heard of that brand." There are thousands upon thousands of people who don't know what mirrorless cameras are, and who could benefit from using them.
  • Encouragement - As I watched hundreds of people capturing moments with their iPhones, I was moved by how delighted they were when then got the shot they wanted. With my own friends and family, I decided that I should jump in, offer encouragement for their efforts. I would see, right on the spot them applying some of the techniques we discussed on their next round of captures.
  • Protection - I've started working the question: "Do you have cloud backup for your images?" into these conversations. In some instances, I could show them right on the spot how easy it was to enable this on their phones, and how important it was to do so.
  • Follow Up - I carry business cards for all sorts of reasons, but over the last few days, I've used them for people who might need help choosing their next camera or some other aspect of photography that they were wondering about.
  • We're All in this Together - Photography is one of the most satisfying hobbies in the world. Technology has certainly made aspects of it much easier. But I've discovered there is so much that many people don't understand, and that you and I can help them, which in turn nurtures our entire community.

HyperCube Automatically Backs up Your Smartphone Pics While Charging

You can read the entire article here. Here are some of my favorite excerpts:

Running out of storage space on our smartphones and tablets is a common problem. Now, there's now a tiny device designed to address that, and it does so while you charge your device. Called the HyperCube, it's the latest offering HYPER by Sanho Corporation dropped on Kickstarter following their highly successful, crowdfunded USB-C hubs.

The HyperCube has a micro SD slot, a male USB connector, and two female USB ports. It connects between the USB charger and your iPhone or Android smartphone or tablet. A free app allows you to automatically backup all the photos, media, and contacts onto a micro SD slot or USB drive as your device charges. You can disconnect anytime, as the backup resumes once you reconnect. No more scrambling to delete photos and videos from your phone and card storage when you run out of space!

Do You Have a Film Camera that Needs a Good Home?

Over the last year, I've received donations from TDS members who have film cameras that need a good home. What I do is inspect the items, repair and clean as I can, then list them in TheFilmCameraShop where I can find a good home for them. If you're interested in donating, please use the Contact Form on TheNimblePhotographer site. And thanks for you consideration!

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Portfoliobox - Your PortfolioBox site is the best way to show off your best images.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.