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When I saw an image of Jim Sollows on the radio with a friend in Japan, I was impressed by both the photograph itself and his adjustment to Shelter-in-Place. I thought, "We should be doing more of this." It's both inspiring and comforting.

Social Distancing in the extreme (see description) Photo by Jim Sollows, photographer, communicating with others from his home via ham radio.

The Digital Story already has a The Digital Story Public Photography Group that's set up and running. Why not use it for the purpose of us showing and telling our stories of adapting to life during COVID-19? So here's what I'm proposing.

Take a picture that represents a productive activity that you're doing at home and post it to Public Photography Group. Be sure to include some words about the images and how you're doing. I also recommend that you add the tag: #ProductiveAtHome to the picture. I've kicked things off with the changes that I've made to my "what was once a portrait shooting room".

Portrait Room Conversion During Shelter-in-Place in California, my portrait room at the studio has been converted to a small product photography studio with a workstation for TheFilmCameraShop and TheDigitalStory #ProductiveAtHome

Sharing to the Public Group is easy. Here are the steps.

Join-Group.jpg Join the Group!

Add-to-Group.jpg Click on Add to Group from your picture page.

share-to-group.jpg Choose The Digital Story and click on the Done button.

Show the world how you've adapted to this important time in all of our lives, and get inspired by others who are doing the same.

You can also share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #731, March 24, 2020. Today's theme is "How to Disinfect Your Gear." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Whether it's our smartphone or an interchangeable lens camera, our tech gear qualifies as some of our most personal possessions. We hold them in our hands, bring them to our face, and show them to other people. It only makes sense that we keep these items as clean as possible. This week I'll talk about good habits for healthy photography, both with our gear and our immediate surroundings. I hope you enjoy the show.

How to Disinfect Your Gear

One of the first rules when we were working in LA was that you could not hand your camera to another person. Depending on environmental conditions, germs can linger on those surfaces for 24-72 hours. In group conditions, we decided to play it safe.

IMG_2828.jpg

But it's not just others we should be concerned about. We need to take care of ourselves as well. I'm going to talk about cleaning techniques that are worth embracing at any time. So let's get to work.

Follow all instructions on the labels of any products you use. Read the safety notes and follow them!

Dwell Times: What Are They and Why Do They Matter?

This is from the article PathoSans.com. You can read it in its entirety there.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defines dwell time as, "the amount of time that a sanitizer or disinfectant must be in contact with the surface, and remain wet, in order to achieve the product's advertised kill rate." Different disinfectants target a wide array of different pathogens. The surfaces these pathogens inhabit also vary greatly. For best results, professional cleaners must know the target pathogens and the corresponding dwell times. Some products may have dwell times of only seconds, while others may require up to 10 minutes or more before they achieve the desired pathogenic control.

For most projects, the dwell time should be listed on the back label with its application directions.

For maximum effectiveness, we recommend using the two-step cleaning process to help prevent the spread of disease-causing pathogens. Step one: Clean and remove unwanted soils from surfaces using a cleaning solution with a microfiber. This will help to remove potential microbial harborage areas. Step two: Apply a disinfecting solution to surfaces while adhering to the manufacturer recommendations for dilution, safety, and dwell time. Finally, after waiting for the recommended dwell time, remove the solution with a wet/dry vacuum or microfiber.

How to Disinfect Camera Equipment and Spaces

This is from the article LensRentals.com. You can read it in its entirety there. Roger Cicala writes:

I'm qualified to talk about this subject to some degree; I take care of a ton of camera equipment, and I was a physician in my past life. And I've had so many requests for information about this that it seems logical to put something out, so everyone has access to it.

That being said, at this moment in time, there are NO right answers. This is my best knowledge and best opinions. Other people have other thoughts. Two weeks from now, new information may make some of this incorrect or show there are better ways to do things. If I say something today and the CDC says something else next Thursday, go with the CDC.

Finally, we're talking about using products that can have some side effects and cause problems. What I'm going to discuss is relatively safe, but if you use one of these suggestions, be smart, test a small amount on yourself and your gear and make sure it doesn't cause any problems for you.

What Roger says about disinfectants:

  • Soap and Water - Used for 20 seconds is superbly effective on skin and other surfaces. Whatever soap is fine, it works by dissolving the lipid (fatty) capsule around the virus. And here's an alternative for those of you freaking out about "I can't get Lysol wipes". Just use some soap and water, it's effective if not quite as easy.
  • Isopropyl Alcohol - At concentrations of 60% or higher this is very effective although it works a bit better on surfaces than on skin. Purell and most other hand sanitizers are basically 60% isopropyl alcohol. Alcohol may not work as fast as soap, and the rule of thumb is just let it dry rather than wiping it off.
  • Chlorine Bleach - Standard laundry bleach is usually 2.6% to 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (bleach), which is WAY too high a concentration to use for disinfecting. To make a disinfectant, you want to add 20ml of 5.25% bleach to a liter of water. Double it to 40ml if you have 2.6% bleach, etc.
    Two important notes here: NEVER mix chlorine bleach with any other cleanser, or put it into a bottle that used to have another cleanser without thoroughly rinsing the bottle. And mix it in a well-ventilated area just in case. Bleach plus ammonia, vinegar, and several other things can cause noxious fumes. Chlorine bleach is very effective, hospitals use it, but it can be irritating in large quantities, and it can fade dyes and color. If you decide to spray down an entire room, for example, keep people out of that room until the fumes clear.
  • Non-Chlorine Bleach / Oxidizing Agents - There are a lot of products in this category; basically oxy-this, non-bleach that, 'safe bleach,' and of course the dreaded 'non-chemical', 'all-natural', and I'm sure you can get it as organic and non-GMO bleach at slightly higher prices. They mostly are peroxides, like hydrogen peroxide, but often slightly different chemicals that are more stable; regular hydrogen peroxide tends to bubble off and lose effectiveness over time once it's opened.
    You need at least 2%, and probably 3% peroxide to be an effective disinfectant, and even then, its effectiveness against Coronavirus is 'probable,' but not guaranteed.
  • Quarternary Ammonium Products - There are tons of these (tons of slightly different chemicals, more tons of products containing them). Benzalkonium Chloride is probably the one you see most commonly if you read ingredient labels, but if you're interested in chemical names, just google it. They are both detergents (like soap) and disinfectants, so they're very common in disinfecting wipes and such. They're also what's in most fabric softeners.
    While I haven't seen any actual studies regarding specific effectiveness against Covid-19, they are effective against other coronavirus and expected to be effective against this one.
  • Dryer antistatic sheets usually contain lots of quaternary ammonium compounds. My significant other (an ICU nurse) carries a few in her purse as door grabbers and emergency cleansing wipes.

What Roger says about cleaning your gear

First, remember that if your gear has been sitting away from people for a couple of days, it's safe. If you're on a video production or multi-camera shoot, don't share cameras. Assign who uses what equipment as much as is possible.

Alcohol and Soap - Despite what some manufacturers have said, we, and every repair shop I know have used isopropyl alcohol in 60% or greater concentrations on camera equipment for a long time and haven't seen any adverse effects. Some manufacturers said 99% isopropyl might maybe affect lens coatings. I respectfully disagree, although I will say vigorous rubbing can affect some lens coatings, so take it easy and don't use wire brushes or such.

Don't soak it; that is asking for trouble and isn't necessary. Just moisten it. Use common sense to try to keep your disinfectant on the outside and not let it run into the inside. A light mist with a spray bottle, or a cloth or paper towel dipped in alcohol works great for large surfaces. You might want to dip a Q tip or similar thing to get into small areas or places where you'd rather not spray.

There is a chance that alcohol used repeatedly could dull the rubber of lens rings or camera bodies. I haven't seen it, but I have seen it claimed. I have also heard that it can dull or fog the finish of LCD screens, but again I haven't seen it, and I do know the 'monitor cleaner' I use contains isopropyl alcohol. Still, given the others who claim it can, at least in some cameras, I'd try to keep it to a minimum.

A final note about cameras - I think it's pretty easy and pretty safe to disinfect all of your equipment and studio space or office effectively EXCEPT, for your camera. Let's face it; you (or them) got your face all up in there, so it's the most likely place to have received a big viral load. It's also the place you DON'T want to soak and saturate with any of the above solutions. Plus, the areas around the LCD, viewfinder, etc. are full of nooks and crannies, making them more difficult to get to, and according to some manufacturers, LCD screens might be sensitive to disinfectants. (Again, my own opinion is I haven't seen it, but what manufacturer's say can't just be ignored).

I'd recommend just not sharing cameras on a shoot, right now. If you do share, disinfect it carefully with a minimal solution and set it aside for 24 hours; 48 hours if you are paranoid. Virus particles don't make spores and are not going to last on a surface for a long time. I, personally, am comfortable that 24 hours is long enough, but there is some evidence that it takes 72 hours to be absolutely safe.

Portfoliobox 4 Offers Great Enhancements and Is Available for Free to TDS Listeners

We have many, many Portfoliobox photographers in our community, including myself, and I think all of us are going to enjoy the new features in Version 4 that just launched today.

And if you're not currently a Pro user, I have great news for you at the end of this spot. Here are the highlights for Portfoliobox 4.

  • Add sections to your pages - The initial content of a page can be extended with one or several sections. You can add different types of sections: gallery, text, links, services, team, submenu, contact form, and even blog or store teaser. This allow you to build your page as you like.
  • Add elements to your section - Each element in a section is independent from the others. You can add elements below existing elements, e.g. you can add a border under your menu, or a button below a text. You can even reorder the elements.
  • Edit margins, padding and position - You can easily fine-tune your website by editing the margins, padding or position of each elements on your page.
  • Animations - You can add animation to each element of your website, e.g. fade in, zoom, etc.
  • Client proofing gallery - Allows you to share dedicated and protected photo galleries with your clients. Your client can log in, check the gallery, comment and share their favorites with you. This makes it easy to share and proof directly from your website. You also have the possibility to automatically add a watermark to your photos.
  • E-commerce improvements - New features and functions that will make it easier for your to handle your products & orders. Here is a non-exhaustive list of the new features: digital product, discount codes, flexible shipping rates, duplicate product, stock management, multiple payment solutions, etc.
  • Preview your site before publishing it - You can now build your site offline peacefully, take the time you need to get the result you want. When you're ready, publish your site and choose a domain name. Meanwhile, you can fully preview your work by clicking the preview button at the lower-left corner of your site.

They have published a super helpful 30-minute video that you can watch here to help you get the most out of these features.

And if you don't have a Portfoliobox Pro account, you can get free year by going to www.portfoliobox.net and using Special Offer Code: 15SAMDPTBL81M5. That's right, a 100 percent discount for the first year.

Next week I'll dig deeper into some of these new exciting features. Until then, sign up today so you can follow along with me. And a big thanks to Portfoliobox for co-sponsoring this show.

Update for the TDS 2020 Photography Workshop Season

If you want to join us for a workshop later this year, hop over to the 2020 Workshops Signup Page and get on the Reserve List.

If you have questions about the workshops, feel free to drop me a line using the Contact Form on www.thenimblephotographer.com.

When you decide which event is best for your, jump over to our 2020 Workshops Signup Page and place a $100 deposit to secure your place. Only participants on the Reserve List who have placed a deposit will be eligible to register for a workshop. If you have questions or need more information, fill out the "Send Me Info!" request form. I'll get back to you asap.

  • Humboldt Redwoods and Coast Workshop - May 12-14, 2020 - 2 Seats Remaining -- Our home base for this experience is in the hospitable town of Fortuna that's on the banks of the Eel River. From there we explore the magnificent redwood groves of Humboldt County and the rugged coastline of Northern California. This workshop explores three distinct ecosystems in a satisfying 3-day event. Limited to just 9 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.
  • Lassen Volcanic Park Photo Workshop - July 16-18, 2020 - 2 Seats Remaining -- We'll convene at a spacious cabin at Lake Almanor that serves as our HQ. From there we explore the stunning Lassen landscape, peaceful shores of Lake Almanor, and the magnificent mountain night skies. This hands-on photo workshop is limited to 8 participants and is a wonderful blending of experience, camaraderie, and artistry. Limited to just 8 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.
  • The Eastern Sierra Photography Workshop - Oct. 1-3, 2020 - 0 Seats Remaining - Our event is headquartered at the Silver Maple Inn in Bridgeport, CA - gateway to Bodie, Mono Lake, and June Lake. We'll take advantage of the magical morning light to photograph some of the most unique landscape in North America. We'll photograph the sparkling night skies of the Sierra and explore rustic urban environments. Limited to just 9 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Canvas-React-Front.jpg

Kingston is now shipping two new memory cards that I'm using in my Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark III and in the Fujifilm X100V. And the performance has been terrific. Because the cameras have different hardware configurations, however, I'm using different Kingston cards in each of them. Let me explain.

Canvas Go! Plus SD Memory Card

The Fujifilm X100V has a single UHS-I SD memory card slot, so the Canvas Go! Plus 128 GB SD card (up to 170MB/s read, 90MB/s write) is a great fit for this camera.

Canvas-G0.jpg

"With fast transfer speeds of up to 170MB/s, the Canvas Go! Plus SD card accelerates your workflow and efficiency so that you'll have more time to take your creativity onto the next adventure. With U3 & V30 speed performance, shoot stunning 4K Ultra-HD videos without worrying about slow speeds and dropped frames, or shoot sequential burst-mode photography that's seamless and consistent. View the world as your canvas and take your creativity and inspiration on the road with the Canvas Go! Plus SD."

There's no need to buy a more expensive UHS-II card for the X100V, since the fast UHS-I Canvas Go Plus has the appropriate specs for the hardware. I've shot burst mode, 120 fps HD video, and 4K movies with this card in the X100V, and the results have been great. Plus, the Canvas Go Plus has a durable construction that's necessary for the street photography that I do with this camera.

You can buy a 128 GB Canvas Go Plus SD card from the Kingston site for $26.65. Different capacities are available: 64 GB for $16.50, 256 GB for $48.10, and 512 GB for $169. The 128 GB model is working great in my X100V.

Canvas React Plus SD Memory Card

The Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark III has two memory card slots. The top slot is UHS-II, and the bottom is USH-I. The Canvas React Plus (up to 300MB/s read, 260MB/s write) is the professional choice for the top slot.

P3210850.jpg

"Designed with the latest UHS-II standards and top-of-the-line U3 and V90 speed classes, the Canvas React Plus SD enables you to shoot sequential burst-mode shots with recording speeds of up to 260MB/s. Execute your creativity without experiencing slow speeds and dropped frames while maximizing your workflow and efficiency with the included MobileLite Plus UHS-II SD Reader. With transfer speeds of up to 300MB/s, enhance your post-production process and handle heavy workloads with ease while capturing cinematic quality in high-resolutions."

The 128 GB card with reader is available from the Kingston site for $132.60. Kingston also offers 32 GB for $37.70, 64 GB for $71.50, and 256 GB for $266.50. I'm using the Canvas React Plus SD 128 GB card in the top slot of my OM-D E-M1 Mark III.

I have the camera set up to record RAW files to the top slot with the Canvas React Plus occupying that position and Jpegs go to the bottom slot with the Canvas Go! Plus there. The results have been just what I needed. Shooting RAW burst mode with the Mark III and these cards is truly thrilling.

Choosing the Right Card for Your Hardware

Cameras with UHS-I memory slots can deliver super fast, reliable performance with the right matching card. The Kingston Canvas Go! Plus is the logical fit for these cameras, and they are a wonderful value as well.

Canvas-React-Back.jpg

If, however, you have a UHS-II slot, such as on the Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II or Mark III, then why not maximize the camera's capability with a Canvas React Plus SD memory card and mobile reader? Yes, you will pay more for the faster card, but you're also fully utilizing your hardware investment.

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

I have tested Capture One Pro 20 with RAW files from Fujifilm, Olympus, Nikon, Panasonic, and Pentax, and my feeling is that it's once of the best image processors that I've ever used. I know that you've likely heard this from others as well, but maybe you just haven't had time to try it for yourself.

C1P20-LA-1600.jpg

Well, that time may be now. And if you agree, here's the game plan that I recommend.

  • Download the 30-day free trial of Capture One Pro 20 (Mac/Win). No credit card is required, and it's a fully functioning version.
  • Nose around a bit with the application, watch some of the free Phase One videos, get a feel for the environment.
  • Create a folder of images that you can use for your test library. I recommend a combination of RAW files and Jpegs from a variety of scenes. Make this a completely different folder in your Pictures directory so that it doesn't get confused with the source material for other apps.
  • Start from the beginning with my latest online training and follow along with your own images (or download the asset catalog that comes with the training). There are two options available: Capture One Pro 20 Essential Training on LinkedIn Learning, or, if you're a lynda.com subscriber, you can watch it there as well.

Both trainings are the same and begin with a What's New section, a discussion on the app's strengths and weaknesses, and a simplified typical workflow to help you get off to a fast start.

Once you start to feel a bit more comfortable with the software, I delve into basic color and exposure adjustments, optical fine tuning, layers and masks, more sophisticated color controls, managing your catalog, and efficiency tips.

You can get a feel for the tone of the training by watching this 1-minute introduction.

C1P20-IntroSlide.jpg

Manage and improve your photos with Capture One Pro 20 from Capture One Pro 20 Essential Training by Derrick Story

If you love getting the most out of your RAW files and appreciate a logical image management catalog system, then this might be the time to take a serious look at Capture One Pro 20, and see what you think. My guess is that you will find it time well spent.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #730, March 17, 2020. Today's theme is "Workshop Attendees Speak Out in LA." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

We exited the Uber XL and stepped out into a sparsely populated Hollywood Blvd. I directed us across the street to the Metro station where we descended into its depths via escalator. What we found down there was a scene from a Sci-Fi movie. In this week's TDS Podcast, we talk about this moment and many others that we experienced together during the LA Street Photography Workshop. Hear directly from the four participants who documented this moment in time.

Workshop Attendees Speak Out in LA

Our team had been cut in half. We were down to four photographers and myself. Those who gathered with me at the Rest Haven Cottage in Santa Monica included Susie Powell, Cokie Lepinski, Dave Wilson, and Craig Rowley. They are the voices who you're about to hear from.

LA-Metro-Susie-Powell.jpg Hollywood and Vine Metro Station During the coronavirus - Photo by Susie Powell.

We recorded this conversation on a Sunday afternoon at the kitchen table in the cottage where we held our classes and lab sessions. We had been in the LA area since Thursday, and had witnessed a rapidly changing environment in Southern California.

Over the course of the next few days, we talked with Uber drivers, service providers, and people on the street. Not only did we focus on their stories, but our own safety as well. We constantly cleaned our hands, avoided public transportation, wiped down shared surfaces daily, and did not allow physical contact.

In addition to that, a rain storm had parked over the LA area. Fortunately we were prepared for the showers and all had weather resistant cameras. Three participants shot with Olympus and two with Fujis.

So after nearly three days of this work, I thought it would be a good idea to sit down and discuss what we saw and how we felt about it. So, I'm going to turn the mike over to Susie, Cokie, Dave, and Craig.

Portfoliobox 4 Offers Great Enhancements and Is Available for Free to TDS Listeners

We have many, many Portfoliobox photographers in our community, including myself, and I think all of us are going to enjoy the new features in Version 4 that just launched today.

And if you're not currently a Pro user, I have great news for you at the end of this spot. Here are the highlights for Portfoliobox 4.

  • Add sections to your pages - The initial content of a page can be extended with one or several sections. You can add different types of sections: gallery, text, links, services, team, submenu, contact form, and even blog or store teaser. This allow you to build your page as you like.
  • Add elements to your section - Each element in a section is independent from the others. You can add elements below existing elements, e.g. you can add a border under your menu, or a button below a text. You can even reorder the elements.
  • Edit margins, padding and position - You can easily fine-tune your website by editing the margins, padding or position of each elements on your page.
  • Animations - You can add animation to each element of your website, e.g. fade in, zoom, etc.
  • Client proofing gallery - Allows you to share dedicated and protected photo galleries with your clients. Your client can log in, check the gallery, comment and share their favorites with you. This makes it easy to share and proof directly from your website. You also have the possibility to automatically add a watermark to your photos.
  • E-commerce improvements - New features and functions that will make it easier for your to handle your products & orders. Here is a non-exhaustive list of the new features: digital product, discount codes, flexible shipping rates, duplicate product, stock management, multiple payment solutions, etc.
  • Preview your site before publishing it - You can now build your site offline peacefully, take the time you need to get the result you want. When you're ready, publish your site and choose a domain name. Meanwhile, you can fully preview your work by clicking the preview button at the lower-left corner of your site.

They have published a super helpful 30-minute video that you can watch here to help you get the most out of these features.

And if you don't have a Portfoliobox Pro account, you can get free year by going to www.portfoliobox.net and using Special Offer Code: 15SAMDPTBL81M5. That's right, a 100 percent discount for the first year.

Next week I'll dig deeper into some of these new exciting features. Until then, sign up today so you can follow along with me. And a big thanks to Portfoliobox for co-sponsoring this show.

Update for the TDS 2020 Photography Workshop Season

Those of you on the registration list for the Humboldt Redwoods Workshop, keep an eye out for the registration packet that will go out later this week. We have a great event for you, and I'll be working with you to ensure that you are fully prepared to take advantage of this wonderful opportunity. Plus, we had one seat open up (moved to another workshop), so if you want to join us, hop over to the 2020 Workshops Signup Page and get on the Reserve List.

If you have questions about the other workshops, feel free to drop me a line using the Contact Form on www.thenimblephotographer.com.

When you decide which event is best for your, jump over to our 2020 Workshops Signup Page and place a $100 deposit to secure your place. Only participants on the Reserve List who have placed a deposit will be eligible to register for a workshop. If you have questions or need more information, fill out the "Send Me Info!" request form. I'll get back to you asap.

  • Humboldt Redwoods and Coast Workshop - May 12-14, 2020 - 0 Seats Remaining -- Our home base for this experience is in the hospitable town of Fortuna that's on the banks of the Eel River. From there we explore the magnificent redwood groves of Humboldt County and the rugged coastline of Northern California. This workshop explores three distinct ecosystems in a satisfying 3-day event. Limited to just 9 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.
  • Lassen Volcanic Park Photo Workshop - July 16-18, 2020 - 2 Seats Remaining -- We'll convene at a spacious cabin at Lake Almanor that serves as our HQ. From there we explore the stunning Lassen landscape, peaceful shores of Lake Almanor, and the magnificent mountain night skies. This hands-on photo workshop is limited to 8 participants and is a wonderful blending of experience, camaraderie, and artistry. Limited to just 8 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.
  • The Eastern Sierra Photography Workshop - Oct. 1-3, 2020 - 2 Seats Remaining - Our event is headquartered at the Silver Maple Inn in Bridgeport, CA - gateway to Bodie, Mono Lake, and June Lake. We'll take advantage of the magical morning light to photograph some of the most unique landscape in North America. We'll photograph the sparkling night skies of the Sierra and explore rustic urban environments. Limited to just 9 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

We took a stroll on the Santa Monica Pier at twilight hoping for some colorful night shots. I was packing the Fujifilm X100V and a MeFOTO Backpacker tripod. I wanted color in the sky, so we were shooting before it got completely dark.

Santa Monica Pier Santa Monica Pier - Fujifilm X100V, 15 seconds, f/16, ISO 160, built-in ND Filter - Photo by Derrick Story.

The ferris wheel was the main attraction. I wanted lots of motion the in the shot, so I was hoping for a shutter speed of 15 seconds or longer. Theses are the moments that I appreciate the built-in ND filter. In the case of the X100V, it provided me 3 stops of density.

By setting the ISO to 160 and stopping down the aperture to f/16, I was able to get my 15 seconds with the aid of the built-in ND filter. I used the 2-second self-timer to trip the shutter.

Santa Monica Pier Santa Monica Pier - Fujifilm X100V, 30 seconds, f/16, ISO 160, built-in ND Filter - Photo by Derrick Story.

As night began to settle in, I was able to go for even longer shutter speeds. My next series reached the 30 second mark. The colorful wheel against the steely blue sky was exactly what I was looking for.

Fujifilm-X100V-with-hood.jpg

The built-in ND filter has many advantages: First, you always have it with you. Second, it's very easy to use, with the viewfinder remaining bright and clear. And third, the camera does all the work for you. No crazy calculations are necessary. You just have to enable it and enjoy.

Dig around in your camera menus now and find the setting for the ND filter. Hopefully you have it in your model. Become familiar with it now, so you can tap it when that perfect situation presents itself. Then get that shot!

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

DSCF0901-X100V-Mar2020.jpg

We had to make a lot of adjustments to our TDS photography workshop, but after one day on the streets of LA, I'm so glad we're here.

We've decided to forego public transportation as originally planned, and we're using Uber to get from one location to another. This makes it much easier to manage our contact with surfaces and it limits our close exposure to people we don't know.

But interacting with others is what we're here for. And if we don't do that, we can't tell their stories. We just have to do so at a reasonable distance.

Venice Beach Venice Beach Resident. Fujifilm X100V, ISO 200, 1/210s, f/3.6, Velvia film simulation. Photo by Derrick Story.

And those conversations have been really interesting. We've talked to shop owners who are seeing a steep decline in business, service providers who are trying to do their jobs while staying safe, locals and tourists who are watching a world that suddenly seems so unfamiliar to them.

Santa Monica Pier Santa Monica Pier on a Friday Night. Fujifilm X100V, ISO 500, 1/9s, f/2, +0.7, Velvia film simulation. Photo by Derrick Story.

On one hand, this environment has made our jobs easier. The people who are in public are more accessible. If we walk into a small business, they have time on their hands and are often willing to talk with us. Folks on the street seem interested in sharing their views. And there isn't the crush of traffic that we would normally experience in LA. It's much easier to get around.

Venice Beach "Rest in Peace" - Fujifilm X100V, ISO 200, 1/170th, f/3.2, Velvia film simulation. Photo by Derrick Story.

It's not like things were perfect before COVID-19. The loss of Kobe Bryant and his daughter is still in the air and has had a tremendous impact in Southern California. And economically, it's been very uneven.

Thankfully, nature has brought rain, however. And its welcome cleansing is having a positive effect on the city, physiologically if nothing else.

Abbot Kinney TDS Street Photographers

As for us, we're going about our jobs as well. We're doing our best to document this moment in time, share our thoughts and feelings with each other, and appreciate those we meet and who let us tell their stories.

I feel lucky to have this experience.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #729, March 10, 2020. Today's theme is "My Approach to Coronavirus in 2020." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Having seen my fair share of natural disasters over the last few years, I've refined my approach to decision making in challenging situations. My inclination is to get the facts, evaluate their potential implications, and build a course of action based on that information. Coronavirus is the latest phenomenon for us to contend with. And today I'll talk about my approach as a journalist and artist to the threats and fears surrounding it.

My Approach to Coronavirus in 2020

I was thinking back to my life 10 years ago, and how simple it seemed in comparison to today.

Before I start, I want to say that if anyone in our community is under the weather as a result of seasonal flu of COVID-19, I hope you feel better soon. I care about everyone in our community.

So, we all know about the headlines - the stock market's recent dive, supply chain difficulties for the technology industry, the lack of vaccine for COVID-19, and the introduction of a new term, "social distancing".

wine-tasting-1024.jpg

What I think would be more productive for our time together today is for me to relay what I've witnessed firsthand over the last couple weeks, and then talk about plans moving forward for our community. Let's start with my firsthand accounts from recent activity.

  • Sharks vs Maple Leafs at SAP Center
  • Warriors vs 76ers at Chase Center
  • Holiday Inn Express in Burlingame
  • Cancellation of jobs by LinkedIn and others
  • Questions about TDS Workshops

When I've been in public, I've seen very little coughing. I treat every surface outside of my house as a potential germ-spreader. So I'm careful not to touch my face until I can throughly wash my hands.

When I arrived at the Holiday Inn Express, I wiped down the room including door knobs, phones, remotes, and countertops with disinfectant wipes. I carry tissues and folded paper towells in my pocket incase I do have to touch my face, but I also use them for public surfaces as necessary. I've also been keeping my phone, laptop, iPad, and cameras clean.

Additionally, I've added an hour a night to my sleep, and increased my water intake using the refillable bottle that I always have with me now. I'm also getting as much fresh air as possible and maintaining my exercise routine. I want to be a strong and vibrant as possible right now. And I don't want to create a constant environment in my nose and throat when virus like to congratulate.

I've thought a lot about social distancing, and I've decided that under the current circumstances, I'm going to continue to interact with others. If the numbers change in the areas that I'm working, I will reevaluate my behavior based on those numbers. Until then, I will continue to go about my work.

In terms of our workshop season for 2020, I do not anticipate any changes to our schedule. We're in Los Angeles this week, and I'll be reporting what I experienced there in next week's show. We have our own cottage, which I can wipe down. It will only be us going inside and out of that area. In public, we'll practice appropriate hygiene for the times we live in.

The subsequent events are all in remote locations: Humboldt, Lassen, and Eastern Sierra. I will be able to maintain clean environments at all of those venues. And personally, I think the escape from daily headlines will greatly benefit our artistic pursuit of photography.

I want to remind you that point of this segment is not to make recommendations for you. You have your own process for that. But since our lives are intertwined, I want you to know how I plan to move forward over the course of this year. I think it's important for you to know where I stand and what you can count on. If things change, I will update my plans based on those facts.

Here's What You Can Count on From Me in 2020

The podcast will continue to publish weekly on Tuesdays. Regular posts will continue to flow to thedigitalstory.com, Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. I will maintain my photography jobs with clients, and best that I can, my teaching for LinkedIn Learning and lynda. And we're going to continue to have workshops in great locations throughout California.

My prediction is that 2020 will be a tough financial year for me and many other solopreneurs. But I've built-in some diversity to help offset the losses. We have a loyal Patreon audience. I have level-headed photography clients. And I have the ability to develop new products quickly in a changing environment.

There may not be much that you feel like you can depend on right now. But know that this corner of your world is there for you. I'll see you next week once I return from Southern California.

Do You Have a Film Camera that Needs a Good Home?

Over the last year, I've received donations from TDS members who have film cameras that need a good home. What I do is inspect the items, repair and clean as I can, then list them in TheFilmCameraShop where I can find a good home for them. If you're interested in donating, please use the Contact Form on TheNimblePhotographer site. And thanks for you consideration!

The Upcoming iPhone 12 Pro May Pack a 64MP Camera

You can read the entire article by visiting this link to PetaPixel.com.

If you use an iPhone and megapixels are your thing, the upcoming iPhone 12 may delight you with its camera specs. A new leak suggests that Apple is working to stuff a 64-megapixel sensor into its next top-of-the-line smartphone.

The leaked details were shared by the popular YouTube channel EverythingApplePro, which received the information from tech leaker Max Weinbach, who nailed several iPhone leaked details in 2019.

"For the first time in years, Apple will be crossing the megapixel threshold that they've been at for quite some time -- 12 megapixels -- and bumping up the sensor quality, potentially up to 64 megapixels," Filip Koroy of EverythingApplePro says in the 12-minute video. "Weinbach is reporting that they're testing various sensor sizes. 64 megapixels would be the Sony sensor, very likely, and Apple will be focusing heavily on the camera for the iPhone 12 Pro."

The aperture of the ultra-wide lens on the next iPhone will reportedly be bumped up in size from f/2.4 to around f/1.6 or f/1.7, possibly to allow for Night Mode when using that camera. And the minimum focusing distance is said to be decreasing on the ultra-wide camera, allowing for macro photos to be shot with it. Other features and specs Weinbach is hearing include an improved Smart HDR, a bigger battery (by about 10 percent), a 120Hz display, and 5G.

Update for the TDS 2020 Photography Workshop Season

Those of you on the registration list for the Humboldt Redwoods Workshop, keep an eye out for the registration packet that will go out later this week. We have a great event for you, and I'll be working with you to ensure that you are fully prepared to take advantage of this wonderful opportunity. Plus, we had one seat open up (moved to another workshop), so if you want to join us, hop over to the 2020 Workshops Signup Page and get on the Reserve List.

If you have questions about the other workshops, feel free to drop me a line using the Contact Form on www.thenimblephotographer.com.

When you decide which event is best for your, jump over to our 2020 Workshops Signup Page and place a $100 deposit to secure your place. Only participants on the Reserve List who have placed a deposit will be eligible to register for a workshop. If you have questions or need more information, fill out the "Send Me Info!" request form. I'll get back to you asap.

  • LA Street Photography Experience - March 13-15, 2020 - 1 Seat Remaining - This hands-on workshop guides you on an exploration of classic Los Angeles locations and architecture. Our excursions will take us as far west as Venice Beach, as well as famous movie spots and the back streets of this fascinating Southern California area. Limited to 9 participants and featuring two instructors (Derrick Story and Mike Boening), you will enjoy great photography, food, and friendship with our fellow enthusiasts. Three days, $749. You can place your deposit here.
  • Humboldt Redwoods and Coast Workshop - May 12-14, 2020 - 0 Seats Remaining -- Our home base for this experience is in the hospitable town of Fortuna that's on the banks of the Eel River. From there we explore the magnificent redwood groves of Humboldt County and the rugged coastline of Northern California. This workshop explores three distinct ecosystems in a satisfying 3-day event. Limited to just 9 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.
  • Lassen Volcanic Park Photo Workshop - July 16-18, 2020 - 2 Seats Remaining -- We'll convene at a spacious cabin at Lake Almanor that serves as our HQ. From there we explore the stunning Lassen landscape, peaceful shores of Lake Almanor, and the magnificent mountain night skies. This hands-on photo workshop is limited to 8 participants and is a wonderful blending of experience, camaraderie, and artistry. Limited to just 8 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.
  • The Eastern Sierra Photography Workshop - Oct. 1-3, 2020 - 2 Seats Remaining - Our event is headquartered at the Silver Maple Inn in Bridgeport, CA - gateway to Bodie, Mono Lake, and June Lake. We'll take advantage of the magical morning light to photograph some of the most unique landscape in North America. We'll photograph the sparkling night skies of the Sierra and explore rustic urban environments. Limited to just 9 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

I had my first opportunity last night to look at RAW files in Capture One Pro 20.0.3 from the Fujifilm X100V. Phase One had announced earlier this week that they were the first to provide RAW support for the two new Fujifilm cameras.

X110V-ISO3200-C1P20.jpg Walking to the Shark Tank - Fujifilm X100V, ISO 3200, f/2.0 - Photo by Derrick Story.

I packed the X100V to a San Jose Sharks match against the Toronto Maple Leaves (Sharks win: 5-2). The above image was captured while walking to the Shark Tank at ISO 3200, wide open, camera focused on Jersey 39. I processed the RAW file in Capture One Pro 20.0.3.

All of the Fujifilm simulations were available under Base Characteristics > Curve (as shown). The app recognized the lens and allowed all of the lens corrections including CA, Distortion, diffraction correction, light falloff, and sharpness. And the RAW files were very editable, including excellent highlight and shadow recovery.

Just a note on film simulations: C1P allows you to apply any of them, including Velvia, Provia, Acros, etc. in post production. So as long as you captured the image in RAW, all of your Fujifilm options are always available. The particular simulations that show up in C1P are based on the camera you used.

If you're a Fujifilm photographer, and especially if you have one of their new cameras, Capture One Pro 20 RAW processing is definitely worth a look.

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #728, March 3, 2020. Today's theme is "The Fujifilm X100V Hands On." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

The Fujifilm X100V APS-C compact camera has been steadily evolving since I first saw it at Photokina 2010. Immediately after release, it developed a dedicated following. But there were many, including myself, who remained on the sidelines monitoring its evolution through 5 generations. Today's camera, the 100V, is the result of 10 years of development. And it's the lead topic in today's TDS Photography Podcast.

The Fujifilm X100V Hands On

DSC_0688-2048.jpg

There are so many ways to walkabout the Fujifilm X100V. I've decided to highlight the features that finally won me over, while still noting the couple items that are on my wishlist for the future.

A few of the items that I'll cover have been part of the camera previous to the latest release. But they have been improved, bringing the overall functionality to a new level.And combined with the new introductions, they created the tipping point for me to carry it in my backpack.

So without any further delay, let's get to it.

The Features that Won Me Over for the X100V

  • Hybrid Viewfinder - "The popular Advanced Hybrid Viewfinder has been updated with a higher resolution 3.69m-dot OLED EVF (vs 2.36m-dot) for clearer viewing and a faster refresh rate of 100 fps. This can still be flicked away to reveal a clear 0.52x-magnification optical finder to suit the purists' way of photographing." And that's the deal, I get to have a very cool optical viewfinder with overlay information and an EVF in the same camera. And I use both.
  • 3.0" 1.62m-dot LCD Touchscreen, - This just had to happen for me. So much of my work depends on me using low angles and perspectives from over my head. And without a tilting LCD, I just can't justify the camera. The LCD for the X100V is beautiful. And the tilting functionality elevates the camera to a new level, literally.
  • The Redesigned Fujinon 23mm f/2 Lens - The optic (8 elements in 6 groups) features a revised design that now includes two aspherical elements for improved sharpness and clarity. Improved performance at f/2, especially on the corners. Additionally, a Super EBC coating has been applied to suppress lens flare and ghosting for greater contrast and color fidelity when working in strong lighting conditions. It is wonderfully sharp, and it's close range performance has improved as well. All current accessories from previous models work on the 100V as well.
  • Updated Bluetooth with Realtime GPS Tagging that Actually Works - This is another big deal for me for a camera that I'm going to depend on while traveling. I want to be able to use more than my iPhone for geotagging images. With the updated Bluetooth (v 4.2), the X100V does a great job of staying in contact with my iPhone (via a setting that can be turned on or off) and adding geotags to my images. And it worked perfectly.
  • Weather Resistant Body - Again, a travel camera needs to be able to withstand, well, travel. I added the Vello LHF-X100B adapter and lenshood with a Hoya MNC filter to complete the weather sealing for this camera.
  • Built-In Selectable HDR and Panorama Modes - This is the first built-in camera HDR with 5 settings and 4 strengths that I can actually use without reservation. I'm particularly fond of the HDR 200 and HDR 400 settings that produce very natural results. And the Panorama mode is wonderful.
  • High Speed Movie Mode - I can now record at 120P in full HD and have it playback at 29.97P. And there are many other high speed options as well.

On my wish list, I'm hoping that Fujifilm can find a way to build image stabilization into this same sized body. It's great having 4K and high speed video, but IS makes it so much more usable. A standard headphone jack would be very nice indeed instead the current approach where we have to use an adapter.

I would also like 120fps refresh rate for the EVF vs the current 100 fps. And I don't mind the single SD card slot, but I would like it upgraded from the current UHS-I to UHS-2.

Just a Few More Things that I really Like

The programmable front command dial is wonderful. I set the Exposure Compensation dial to "C" and use the front dial for exposure comp. Very nice! The flash, just like the one on my XF10, is outstanding. Lots of settings and it really gets the job done. And if you need an external flash as well, the hotshoe or wireless capability will get the job done.

The front lever to switch from optical viewfinder to EVF is very convenient. And I use its function button to turn on and off face/eye detection focus, which is much improved. I also appreciate 1/3 clickstops on the aperture ring. I don't recall ever having that luxury. And finally, the film simulations are really enjoyable. And I'm so happy that I finally have Acros and the new Eterna Cinema options. Both are just great.

Bottom Line - The Fujifilm X100V has evolved into a camera that I want to have with me. It's outstanding image quality, unique viewfinder, and host of creative functions will keep me energized about my photography for years to come. It's earned a very high nimbleosity rating.

Do You Have a Film Camera that Needs a Good Home?

Over the last year, I've received donations from TDS members who have film cameras that need a good home. What I do is inspect the items, repair and clean as I can, then list them in TheFilmCameraShop where I can find a good home for them. If you're interested in donating, please use the Contact Form on TheNimblePhotographer site. And thanks for you consideration!

Why I Want Trade Shows to Survive

I tell the story of meeting the Fujifilm X100 at Photokina 2010, and that it's just one of dozens of interactions I've had over the years that couldn't happen any other way. Plus, I love watching how other people approach the booths, where the crowd gathers, and witness how photographers engage with new products. I find this invaluable and entertaining.

I know that photography trade shows are not the most practical expenditure of funds for visitors or exhibitors. But there's an element of magic to them. And I hope that together we can find a path forward for them in 2020 and beyond.

Update for the TDS 2020 Photography Workshop Season

Those of you on the registration list for the Humboldt Redwoods Workshop, keep an eye out for the registration packet that will go out later this week. We have a great event for you, and I'll be working with you to ensure that you are fully prepared to take advantage of this wonderful opportunity. Plus, we had one seat open up (moved to another workshop), so if you want to join us, hop over to the 2020 Workshops Signup Page and get on the Reserve List.

If you have questions about the other workshops, feel free to drop me a line using the Contact Form on www.thenimblephotographer.com.

When you decide which event is best for your, jump over to our 2020 Workshops Signup Page and place a $100 deposit to secure your place. Only participants on the Reserve List who have placed a deposit will be eligible to register for a workshop. If you have questions or need more information, fill out the "Send Me Info!" request form. I'll get back to you asap.

  • LA Street Photography Experience - March 13-15, 2020 - 1 Seat Remaining - This hands-on workshop guides you on an exploration of classic Los Angeles locations and architecture. Our excursions will take us as far west as Venice Beach, as well as famous movie spots and the back streets of this fascinating Southern California area. Limited to 9 participants and featuring two instructors (Derrick Story and Mike Boening), you will enjoy great photography, food, and friendship with our fellow enthusiasts. Three days, $749. You can place your deposit here.
  • Humboldt Redwoods and Coast Workshop - May 12-14, 2020 - 0 Seats Remaining -- Our home base for this experience is in the hospitable town of Fortuna that's on the banks of the Eel River. From there we explore the magnificent redwood groves of Humboldt County and the rugged coastline of Northern California. This workshop explores three distinct ecosystems in a satisfying 3-day event. Limited to just 9 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.
  • Lassen Volcanic Park Photo Workshop - July 16-18, 2020 - 2 Seats Remaining -- We'll convene at a spacious cabin at Lake Almanor that serves as our HQ. From there we explore the stunning Lassen landscape, peaceful shores of Lake Almanor, and the magnificent mountain night skies. This hands-on photo workshop is limited to 8 participants and is a wonderful blending of experience, camaraderie, and artistry. Limited to just 8 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.
  • The Eastern Sierra Photography Workshop - Oct. 1-3, 2020 - 2 Seats Remaining - Our event is headquartered at the Silver Maple Inn in Bridgeport, CA - gateway to Bodie, Mono Lake, and June Lake. We'll take advantage of the magical morning light to photograph some of the most unique landscape in North America. We'll photograph the sparkling night skies of the Sierra and explore rustic urban environments. Limited to just 9 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.